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  1. #1
    aliii is offline Banned
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    Default comparisons with adjectives

    Hello,

    It is written that the second part of a comparison with than must be parallel to the first part.

    -To study Engilish is more succesful for you than to study math. (It is ok).

    My question is: Can we omit to for this sentence?

    To study Engilish is more succesful for you than study math.

  2. #2
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: comparisons with adjectives

    Your original sentence is not okay.

    You will be more successful if you study English than if you study math.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. #3
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: comparisons with adjectives

    Your incorrect original sentence could also be rewritten:

    To study English is more important for you than to study maths (BE spelling).

    Rover

  4. #4
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: comparisons with adjectives

    Good rewrite, Rover.

    aliii, note that the "to" is required.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. #5
    aliii is offline Banned
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    Default Re: comparisons with adjectives

    My question was for learning that whether 'to' is required or not.Thank you...

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: comparisons with adjectives

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Your incorrect original sentence could also be rewritten:

    To study English is more important for you than to study maths (BE spelling).
    Or-

    Studying English is more important for you than studying maths.

  7. #7
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: comparisons with adjectives

    Quote Originally Posted by aliii View Post
    It is written that ...
    You have begun more than one thread with these words. It would be interesting if you told us where you have seen these 'rules' written.
    Last edited by 5jj; 31-Oct-2011 at 22:06. Reason: typo

  8. #8
    aliii is offline Banned
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    Default Re: comparisons with adjectives

    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...nfinitive.html

    It is from an English teacher :

    Here are some ways to use "prefer":

    1) subject + prefer + to infinitive [+ any other things like preposition, objects, etc] {+ [rather] than + [to] infinitive [+ any other things like preposition, objects, etc]}.
    2) subject + prefer + gerund [+ any other things like preposition, objects, etc] {+ to + gerund [+ any other things like preposition, objects, etc]}.
    3) subject + prefer + object {+ to + object}.
    4) subject + prefer [+ that] + full clause.

    And my question was that we can omit 'to' or not.The teacher named C.Cal said yes. I didn't understand anything :(:(:(

    To study English will be better for you than play football. (Is it ok?)
    To study English will be better for you than to play football. (It is ok)
    Last edited by aliii; 31-Oct-2011 at 22:55.

  9. #9
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: comparisons with adjectives

    Quote Originally Posted by aliii View Post
    It This is from an English teacher :

    Here are some ways to use "prefer": 1) subject + prefer, etc

    And my question was that we can omit 'to' or not.The teacher named C.Cal said yes. I didn't understand anything :(:(:(
    1. The post to which you refer was made by someone who called him/herself a teacher, and who posted only once in this forum. We have no way of knowing what knowledge or expertise s/he had. We do not know his/her native language or country of origin. We cannot therefore take him/her as any form of authority.

    2. The original answer given by C.Cal was not 100% correct.

    3. In any case, C.Cal did not say 'yes' in answer to your question.

    4. You will not understand things if you mix questions and examples.

    Now, to your last question:

    "To study English will be better for you than play football. (Is it ok?) NO
    To study English will be better for you than to play football. (It is ok?)" It's acceptable grammatically. It would be more natural to say:

    It will be better for you to study English than to play football

  10. #10
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    Default Re: comparisons with adjectives

    Would it also be all right to use the -ing form here combined with an infinitive form? Like this:
    To study English will be better for you than playing football.
    or do I have to use the -ing form in both clauses? e.i.
    Studying English will be better for you than playing football.

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