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  1. #1
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
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    what's the opposite of this?

    - On the south coast winds will pick up during the afternoon, becoming strong by the evening.

    I think the verb in bold means "to start becoming stronger", am I right?
    Now, is it pick down or calm down the opposite of this verb? I mean, how to say that winds are becoming weaker?

  2. #2
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    Re: what's the opposite of this?

    You are right.

    Winds drop, fall, decrease or lessen

  3. #3
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: what's the opposite of this?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    You are right.

    Winds drop, fall, decrease or lessen
    what about "to blow over" referring to winds? Could this be an opposite verb to "pick up"?

  4. #4
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    Re: what's the opposite of this?

    No, a storm blows over when it's done.

    Winds pick up, winds drop off. (Or decrease or lessen, as stated above, but "drop off" is the most common one I hear.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. #5
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    Re: what's the opposite of this?

    COCA gives 19 examples of 'wind dropped', and none of 'wind dropped off'.

    I saw that three of the 'wind dropped' examples were not relevant - 'The wind dropped the handkerchief', for example - but that still leaves 16.

  6. #6
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    Re: what's the opposite of this?

    I would say that winds "die down".

  7. #7
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    Re: what's the opposite of this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    No, a storm blows over when it's done.

    Winds pick up, winds drop off. (Or decrease or lessen, as stated above, but "drop off" is the most common one I hear.)
    ... or a tree blows over in a storm.

    Winds also 'die down' (as emsr2d2 has said) - but this is usually quite a dramatic change; often they just 'ease off' rather than dying down completely.

    (So many things for winds to do. I'm glad I don't have to learn this stuff. )

    b

  8. #8
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: what's the opposite of this?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    ... or a tree blows over in a storm.

    Winds also 'die down' (as emsr2d2 has said) - but this is usually quite a dramatic change; often they just 'ease off' rather than dying down completely.

    (So many things for winds to do. I'm glad I don't have to learn this stuff. )

    b
    If a wind suddenly died down, I would agree that it's a dramatic change. However, surely they can gradually die down over a period of time.

  9. #9
    BobK's Avatar
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    Re: what's the opposite of this?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    If a wind suddenly died down, I would agree that it's a dramatic change. However, surely they can gradually die down over a period of time.
    Yes - I thought - as I was writing it - that 'dramatic' was the wrong word; perhaps 'measurable' or 'perceptible'... but they're still not right.

    b

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