Results 1 to 6 of 6
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 116
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    to escape or to have escaped

    My dear teachers, every time I read your answer posts, I am toched. How great you are.
    Now your help is appreciated here again.
    I came across such a sentence:
    In preparing the handbook, tha author can not hope to have escaped the sin of omission .
    What does this sentence mean?
    If I change the sentence into the following one, is there any difference between them?
    In preparing the handbook, tha author can not hope to escape the sin of omission.
    Thanks a lot. I am waiting for your answers in China.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 16,355
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: to escape or to have escaped

    It means the author may have missed something out.

    Your alteration does not improve the sentence.

    Rover

  1. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,167
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: to escape or to have escaped

    1. In preparing the handbook, the author can not hope to have escaped the sin of omission .
    S/he recognises the futility of her hope that s/he did not leave out anything while she was writing.

    2. In preparing the handbook, the author can not hope to escape the sin of omission.
    S/he recognises the futility of her hope that she is not leaving out anything while she is writing.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 116
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: to escape or to have escaped

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    It means the author may have missed something out.

    Your alteration does not improve the sentence.

    Rover


    Thanks. But I still think there are some differences between the two sentences.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 116
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: to escape or to have escaped

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    1. In preparing the handbook, the author can not hope to have escaped the sin of omission .
    S/he recognises the futility of her hope that s/he did not leave out anything while she was writing.

    2. In preparing the handbook, the author can not hope to escape the sin of omission.
    S/he recognises the futility of her hope that she is not leaving out anything while she is writing.
    Sorry, I made a spelling mistake. I can't agree you more. That is how I understand the differences between them too.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,167
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: to escape or to have escaped

    Quote Originally Posted by tianhang View Post
    Thanks. But I still think there are some differences between the two sentences.
    As I pointed out in my earlier post. However, in practical terms, there is no significant difference.

    In any case, both have a distinctly old-fashioned ring.
    Last edited by 5jj; 07-Nov-2011 at 13:52. Reason: typo

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] escaped unharmed or escaped unharmedly
    By phoenixqn81 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-Feb-2009, 13:18
  2. to be caught up, escaped/saved, lucky/fortune
    By user_gary in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-Oct-2008, 21:44
  3. escaped unhurt vs survived
    By majid72 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Dec-2007, 12:58
  4. escaped unhurt vs survived
    By majid72 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Dec-2007, 12:09
  5. escape from
    By peter123 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-Oct-2007, 07:29

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •