View Poll Results: I missed my bus but stil managed to get there ___ time.

Voters
2145. This poll is closed
  • on

    1,508 70.30%
  • by the

    39 1.82%
  • in

    522 24.34%
  • at the

    66 3.08%
  • for the

    10 0.47%
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Results 41 to 50 of 55
  1. #41
    The French is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: In time & On time

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    I often use the two interchangeably. I think there is a difference though, with on time being used when the speaker has a specific time in mind.

    Hello, I'm The French,

    it's very special the use for in or on, it's the same meaning but for French I think in time it's more normal.

    When I use on, I think all the time 'on the table', "in" means for me it's into the period of time, but I'm not English.

    Bye

  2. #42
    real.madrid is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: In time & On time

    Hello all friends

    I think " in time "

    thank you
    ------------10---9---8--7--6--5--4--3--2--1--0
    ReAl.MaDrId

  3. #43
    rimo83 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: In time & On time

    Hi,

    I think after reviewing the link in post# 8 which is Definition of in time - WordReference.com Dictionary


    in_time

    A) adverb
    1- eventually, yet, sooner or later, in time, one of these days within an indefinite time or at an unspecified future time; "he will understand eventually"; "he longed for the flowers that were yet to show themselves"; "sooner or later you will have to face the facts"; "in time they came to accept the harsh reality"

    2- in time, soon enough without being tardy; "we made it to the party in time"



    on_time

    A) adjective
    1- on time, prompt
    according to schedule or without delay; "they were always on time"; "a prompt reply"

    B) adverb
    1- on time, not late, not delayed
    at the expected time; "she always arrives on time"

    Although i voted for (in) but now i think it's (on) cause it have certin times comes in.

  4. #44
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    Default Re: In time & On time

    Quote Originally Posted by the player View Post
    on time ----> exactly the time of begining that thing
    in time ----> just before.
    after time ----> it's late

    That's what my english teacher has explained to us at the british centre, is it right?
    Wow~The explanation is clearly! I can understand it with my poor English~

  5. #45
    nitikasnv is offline Banned
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    Default Same meaning

    Hi,

    Meaning of both the word is same.

    Meaning :A number, as of years, days, or minutes, representing such an

    interval.

    Thanks

  6. #46
    briseis is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: In time & On time

    i think it should be 'on' time. because it explained the condition.

  7. #47
    richelle is offline Newbie
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    Smile Re: In time & On time

    "on time" is proper, but "in time" can be used in spoken language.

  8. #48
    crapal is offline Newbie
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    Smile Re: In time & On time

    I'm French and i realized that this problem is exactly the same in French:
    to be "in Time" = "être dans les temps" means that you manage to do something before the expiry date.
    to be "on time" = "à temps" means exactly at the scheduled time, at this very moment.
    Perhaps I'm wrong but I feel it like this.
    So my answer would be "On Time"
    Last edited by crapal; 26-Feb-2010 at 22:47.

  9. #49
    boo mayed is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: In time & On time

    I would say on time

    why ? all time our teacher ask this question
    we reply --> this answer fits to the text .

  10. #50
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    Default Re: In time & On time

    * on time --- is correcte

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