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  1. #11
    ohmyrichard is offline Member
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    Re: Anything wrong with my note for UPS deliveryman?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    It's been said that in Texas, football is more of a religion than a pasttime.

    The Oklahoma game was ugly (if your'e a Texas fan). They did much better this week against Texas Tech.
    When I was watching the live broadcast that day, I noticed that there are two teams called Texas and Texas Tech respectively taking part in the serial games. Then is the team of Texas the UT Austin team? Yes, that day Texas lost the game to Oklahoma by a big margin.
    You are right about football in Texas. I have seen that on the campus of O'Henry Middle School near my residence almost every afternoon students are practising it under the guidance of PE teachers. When I first got here, I took some pics of them and sent them to my wife and daughter for a look.

  2. #12
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    emsr2d2 is online now Moderator
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    Re: Anything wrong with my note for UPS deliveryman?

    I think that the people who teach the kids to play football there are called "football coaches" not "PE teachers".

    In BrE, a PE teacher is someone who teaches children from the age of 5 until about 12, teaching them a variety of sports or just helping them to keep fit. My PE teachers in my first two schools took us for swimming, netball, hockey, football, kickball, gym etc. They did not usually have a specialist sport.

    In America, I believe that sports are taken much more seriously in schools so there will be a specific baseball coach, football coach, basketball coach etc.

    As always, I'm ready to be corrected by my friends across the pond.

  3. #13
    SoothingDave is online now VIP Member
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    Re: Anything wrong with my note for UPS deliveryman?

    A high school football coach is traditionally also a teacher. Often a PE teacher, rather than an "academic" subject. The coaching is done for an extra stipend, an addition to his normal salary.

    Of course, there are exceptions. Some coaches have other professions/occupations and are paid by the school district only to coach.

    I don't think we are at the point of a full time, full salary coach at the high school level. Though if it were to happen, i'm sure it would happen in Texas first.

  4. #14
    SoothingDave is online now VIP Member
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    Re: Anything wrong with my note for UPS deliveryman?

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmyrichard View Post
    When I was watching the live broadcast that day, I noticed that there are two teams called Texas and Texas Tech respectively taking part in the serial games. Then is the team of Texas the UT Austin team? Yes, that day Texas lost the game to Oklahoma by a big margin.
    You are right about football in Texas. I have seen that on the campus of O'Henry Middle School near my residence almost every afternoon students are practising it under the guidance of PE teachers. When I first got here, I took some pics of them and sent them to my wife and daughter for a look.
    Yes, the University of Texas team (Usually just known as "Texas" on the scoreboard) is from the Austin campus.

  5. #15
    ohmyrichard is offline Member
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    Re: Anything wrong with my note for UPS deliveryman?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Yes, the University of Texas team (Usually just known as "Texas" on the scoreboard) is from the Austin campus.
    Thanks a lot for confiming my guess.
    To take "Texas" as an example, lack of information will sure get one confused about the meaning of things, and oftentimes too much detailed information will lead to the same result. Very often when I go to wikipedia for information about say British and American school systems, I get clear, confused, clear again ,confused again, and ultimately confused while reading those entries. The other day I asked the Chinese guy who subleased his rental apartment to me about the differences between middle school, junior high school, senior high school, and high school, this guy, who has been living in America for twelve years failed to come up with an answer. When you've got a minute, please tell me about their differences and commonality.
    Thanks.

  6. #16
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    Re: Anything wrong with my note for UPS deliveryman?

    Traditionally, "junior high" is 7th and 8th grade - ages 12-14 or so.

    "Middle school" usually starts in 6th grade, so it's 6th, 7th, and 8th.

    I understand that the "junior high" that I went to as a child is now a middle school.

    I don't hear the term "senior high school" used that much -- usually it's just "high school," but the terms are synonymous - grades 9-12, or ages 14-18 (more or less).

    Adding to the fun, we use "school" in the US to mean college/university, so if you say "My kids are still in school" it could mean they are 5 or 22." And if you say "Where did you go to school?" it means "where did you go to college/university."

    And finally, we don't really differentiate between college/university. I've seen other sites where someone has given entirely wrong information, saying a college is less prestigious and doesn't offere the same degree. Both a college and a university award bachelor's degrees.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. #17
    SoothingDave is online now VIP Member
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    Re: Anything wrong with my note for UPS deliveryman?

    Just to clarify Barb's point, a school district will usually have three schools for children of different ages. First, from Kindergarten to grade 5 or 6 is "elementary" school (or sometimes "grade school"). Then there is either a junior high (7-8) or a middle school (6-7-8). Finally, there is the high school (or senior high) for grades 9-12.

  8. #18
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    Re: Anything wrong with my note for UPS deliveryman?

    The system in Britain is very different. I shan't go into it here, as the question has not been asked. I'll just note that "My kids are still in at school" could not be used there for offspring over the age of 18/19, and 'college' in Britain is often (but not always!) a 16-19 extablishment.

  9. #19
    ohmyrichard is offline Member
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    Re: Anything wrong with my note for UPS deliveryman?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Just to clarify Barb's point, a school district will usually have three schools for children of different ages. First, from Kindergarten to grade 5 or 6 is "elementary" school (or sometimes "grade school"). Then there is either a junior high (7-8) or a middle school (6-7-8). Finally, there is the high school (or senior high) for grades 9-12.
    Thanks a lot. Then I've got a follow-up question along your line: Are elmentary school, middle school and high school independent of each other? May it be that a junior high and a senior high are two administrative parts of one school and there is only one head teacher /principal for them?

    I used to work in such a school for three years before I started my MA studies back in China. Now the junior high part of that school is an independent school at a new location and the senior high now does not share the campus with it.
    In China, when we say "the middle school"(not in the American sense), we mean a school for students who have graduated from elementary school and haven't been admitted into higher education institutions.So, in Chinese school system, this "middle" means "between elementary school and college/university" and "the middle school" in Chinese is a too vague or general term which is usually made speccific by saying that a stuent is attending a junior high or senior high. You will see that there is a huge difference between "the middle school" in China and a middle school in America.

    Please give an answer to my questions at the beginning of this same post. Thanks.

  10. #20
    ohmyrichard is offline Member
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    Re: Anything wrong with my note for UPS deliveryman?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    The system in Britain is very different. I shan't go into it here, as the question has not been asked. I'll just note that "My kids are still in at school" could not be used there for offspring over the age of 18/19, and 'college' in Britain is often (but not always!) a 16-19 extablishment.
    Please tell me about the British education system. About four years ago when I chatted with a British college girl student about your education system, she gave me too much information and threw me directly into confusion. It seemed that your education system is rather complicated, especially its higher education part. Tell me something about it to help me to get a clear idea about it.
    Thanks.

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