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Thread: non-count nouns

  1. #1
    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Default non-count nouns

    Dear teacher,

    1) Are names of fish uncountable ?
    e.g. trout, salmon, cod, carp, tuna(s)?

    2) Can the word “reading” be used in the plural (= readings)?

    3) Is there a difference between “fume” and “fumes”?

    4) Does the word “garment” always take a plural verb?

    Thank you for your help.
    Hela

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    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: non-count nouns

    Dear teachers,

    In an exercise on non-count nouns on the web they said that family in the following context should be countable but I disagree. What is your view about the question, please?

    "Most men C in my family C (??) don't wear jewelry NC ."

    All the best,
    Hela

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    Default Re: non-count nouns

    It's the noun that's countable, Hela, not how many families a person might actually have.

    singular: We all have a family.
    plural: Hundreds of thousands of families were displaced after the earthquake.

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    Default Re: non-count nouns

    1) Are names of fish uncountable; e.g., trout, salmon, cod, carp, tuna?
    In my dialect, yes. They are non-count. No -s.

    2) Can the word “reading” be used in the plural (= readings)?
    Yes. But it may be regulated to certain situations; e.g., Professor: Did you do the readings I assigned last week?

    3) Is there a difference between “fume” and “fumes”?
    Yes, and "fume" is usually in the plural. The difference . . . ? Possibly, and this is my guess, "fume" = small or quantifiable amount, whereas "fumes" = large or unquantifiable amount.

    4) Does the word “garment” always take a plural verb?
    Not in my dialect. It's a count noun; e.g., There is a garment on the floor; That garment comes with a belt; These garments are for sale.

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    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: non-count nouns

    Thanks Casiopea,

    Now, is "ore" uncountable? (What's the difference between ore, minerals and materials?)

    What about "foodstuff", can we say "foodstuffs"? If yes, how come "stuff" is uncountable then?

    In the exercise already mentioned it is said that "funds" in the following sentence is countable but I disagree since the word is always used in the plural. What is your view?

    "It took great courage for Farboddy to admit to embezzling funds from the bank."

    All the best,
    Hela

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    Default Re: non-count nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by hela
    Now, is "ore" uncountable? (What's the difference between ore, minerals and materials?)
    "ore" is non-count in my dialect. It's mass.

    "minerals" and "materials" refers to things.

    What about "foodstuff", can we say "foodstuffs"? If yes, how come "stuff" is uncountable then?
    Speakers have been known to say, "foodstuffs"; i.e., things that are food or things you use to make food. Again, "things" is expressed.

    In the exercise already mentioned it is said that "funds" in the following sentence is countable but I disagree since the word is always used in the plural. What is your view?
    Well, there's "a fund"; e.g., the earthquake fund, the fund drive, and then there's "funds"; i.e., money, monies.

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