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  1. #1
    Billie9274 is offline Newbie
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    Default I have some curiosity about Shakespeare.

    Hello.
    I have some curiosity about Shakespeare.

    One day, I found a short comedy clip and also found a sentence from it saying,
    'Amest I bovvered?'.
    At first I found it very strange and soon I realized that it's like an Old English thing.

    So, I thought maybe I can find this things in pieces like shakespeare(although I can't read) because that was written in almost 400 years ago; But when I read anything like shakespeare, I could only find differences in grammar and 'thy thee art thou' things..sometimes some different spellings and unfamiliar-looking words.

    Except these, it was almost like a modern english to me,personally.
    What happened? Or maybe have I been just reading an modified version?(like everywhere in the internet?)

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: I have some curiosity about Shakespeare.

    We need more information about the clip before we can begin to answer your question.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: I have some curiosity about Shakespeare.

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    We need more information about the clip before we can begin to answer your question.
    Here's your context:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxB1gB6K-2A

  4. #4
    Billie9274 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: I have some curiosity about Shakespeare.

    Thank you! I wasn't able to post a link. So, I was writing down all the stories just then.
    It's in 3:36.
    Last edited by Billie9274; 19-Nov-2011 at 09:00.

  5. #5
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: I have some curiosity about Shakespeare.

    Quote Originally Posted by Billie9274 View Post
    Thank you! I wasn't able to post a link. So, I was writing down all the stories just then.
    It's in 3:36.
    I don't know if "amest" or "amst" was ever used - I'm pretty sure it's not in Shakespeare - but the skit is based on a teacher trying to teach Shakespeare, and Lauren is using a lot of mock-Elizabethan words and phrases.
    In fact, the "-st" ening was used for the second person: "Thou wast; thou didst; thou speakest"
    Don't believe anything she says.

  6. #6
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: I have some curiosity about Shakespeare.

    Thanks for the link, raymott.

    Billie, the 'schoolgirl' in that sketch was using mock-Shakespearian language for comedy effect. If you managed to work out that the words were 'amèst I bovverèd', then your listening skills are quite sharp. Indeed, if you can follow sketches like that, then your listening skills are at near-native level. I am surprised that you did not get the point.

  7. #7
    Billie9274 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: I have some curiosity about Shakespeare.

    Thank you very much. :)
    I knew 'Amest I bovvered?' is quite like a mock-language, but since I'm mearly a non-native student I didn't know the terms like that were used. -now I know it thanks to you. Thank you!
    Last edited by Billie9274; 19-Nov-2011 at 22:34.

  8. #8
    asmaa shaban ali is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: reading alot for shakespeare improve your english language specially in macbeth.

    reading alot for shakespeare improve your english language and you will find what you want in macbeth.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: reading alot for shakespeare improve your english language specially in macbeth.

    Quote Originally Posted by asmaa shaban ali View Post
    reading alot for shakespeare improve your english language and you will find what you want in macbeth.
    Reading a lot of Shakespeare will improve your English. You will find what you are looking for in Macbeth.

    Welcome to the forums.

    I'm not sure what the point of this post is, however. What is this person, who posted many months ago, looking for? What will be found in Macbeth? (I'm not sure that reading Shakespeare as it was written will help many people learning English; even native speakers struggle with the language of the 1500s.)

    Please note that capital letters are an important part of correct English.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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