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  1. #1
    Csika is offline Member
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    Default integration vs. integrating machine

    Dear Forum Users,

    If we have a machine that integrates, is that an:

    1. integration machine
    2. integrating machine?

    Thank you.

    Csika

  2. #2
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    JohnParis is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: integration vs. integrating machine

    Integrating machine.
    Especially if it is an instrument indicating the mean value or total sum of a measured quantity.

    John

  3. #3
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: integration vs. integrating machine

    It's an integrator.

    Rover

  4. #4
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    Default Re: integration vs. integrating machine

    That's a possibility, Rover.

    Perhaps if we knew a bit more about what the machine did we could give a definitive answer.

    In drug research laboratories, the integrating machine keeps track of the entire amount of one chemical substance that is introduced (slowly) into another. It keeps track of the quantity and the time the substance was introduced into the mass.

    Because Csika used the word "machine", I was drawn to my definition. However, it may very well be the electronic device your link describes. It may also be something completely different.

    Csika, give us a hand here.

    John

  5. #5
    Csika is offline Member
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    Default Re: integration vs. integrating machine

    Thanks for your replies. John, your explanation is more than satisfactory.

    Thank you.

    Csika

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