View Poll Results: No sooner had I arrived ___ I noticed what was wrong.

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Thread: No sooner

  1. #41
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    Default Re: No sooner

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    No, you can't say that. There are, however, plenty of ways to talk about rain. You can have

    • a driving rain
      a mist
      a drizzle
      it coming down in sheets
      it pouring down
      it coming down in buckets
      it raining cats and dogs


    That's good for now. :D
    A student of mine referred me to this post after I corrected his work.

    The above is totally incorrect.

    You cannot have "a drizzle" anymore than you can have "a rain". It is simply drizzle or rain.

    Also The "it coming down " and "it pouring" is appalling English. It should "it is coming . . . " or "it is pouring . . . " or "it is raining . . . "

  2. #42
    soutter is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: No sooner

    Simple English.

    The comparative needs something to be compared with;
    therefore "I am bigger than X!" and of course the conjunction than.

    No sooner said than done (almost simultaneously do the cause and effect occur).

    "Sooner you than me."
    (In written formal English,
    "Sooner you than I").

    Never confuse than with that.

    Francophones this is your umpteenth warning (parce-que than se traduit en tant que que en franšais)!

  3. #43
    BookAddict is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: No sooner

    I would call it UNREAL COMPARATIVE TEMPORAL CLAUSE.

    No sooner had he come than he started to clean the apartment.

    Paraphrase:
    he has not come yet and he started...

    non-sense, of course. In order to stress the fact that the cleaning began immediately after his arrival we use a reverse temporal clause. Why? Because a second is "a long time"

    he came and started cleaning the very second

    In my mother tongue I would say the paraphrastic, non-realistic but perfectly clear
    he has not come yet and he has already started...

  4. #44
    BookAddict is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: No sooner

    In order to stress the fact that the second activity (noticed) occurred immediately after the first (arrived) we say (not only in English) that both activities occurred at the same time
    * my arriving was not later than my noticing

  5. #45
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    Default Re: No sooner

    than

  6. #46
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    Wink Re: No sooner

    I've recently learnt that "no sooner" should be followed by "than"......
    I guess the reason for this is that "no sooner (A) than (B)" compares the previous action (A) to the later one (B).

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