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  1. #1
    jimny is offline Newbie
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    Default "wiliness to help" phrase

    Hi there,
    I have a question about the phrase from the thread title. My former employer gave me the references, which I think have hidden text...

    "Xxxxxx has worked with me in Xxxxx, as a builder, reworker and quick fixer on the desktop line of business for over 3 years. Xxxxxx has proven to be a big asset to my team. His timekeeping, attitude and wiliness to help is outstanding. His productivity is excellent. I would have no problem recommending Xxxxxx as a future employee to any company."

    I dont like the part in bold.. but I am not fluent nor native English speaker and maybe it is kind of idiom or something, could you please help me to understand correctly what my former employer wanted to say by this?
    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: "wiliness to help" phrase

    It is positive, though it should have been spelt 'willingness'. Your employer has said that you are always willing, ready, prepared to help.

    It might be an idea to get your employer to correct the spelling.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  3. #3
    jimny is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: "wiliness to help" phrase

    yes, you are right, "willingness to help" sounds a lot better and I figured it out myself that it should be willingness instead of wiliness.. but isnt this made on purpose? Isnt the phrase "wiliness to help" ever used in some situations? Google gave me 25k results.. comparing to 7mln of "willingness to help"... 25k people just made incorrect spelling?

  4. #4
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: "wiliness to help" phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by jimny View Post
    I figured it out myself that it should be willingness instead of wiliness.. but isnt this made done on purpose?
    It's possible, I suppose, but it seems to me highly unlikely.
    Isn,t the phrase "wiliness to help" ever used in some situations? No Google gave me 25k results.. comparing to 7mln of "willingness to help"... 25k people just made incorrect spelling?
    The few I looked at all seemed to be cases of careless spelling.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  5. #5
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    Default Re: "wiliness to help" phrase

    The expression as he spelled it was simply a typo. It does not exist as an idiom and any results you foung on Google were also typos.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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