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Thread: buzzkiller

  1. #1
    kyungmin is offline Newbie
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    Default buzzkiller

    I know meaning of each two words. but I think, it become different word whet these two words compound. what is the exact meaning of 'buzzkiller'??

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: buzzkiller

    I don't know either. Perhaps it's a sound-proofing device?... Or maybe insect repellent... Some context would help.

    b

  3. #3
    iKitty is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: buzzkiller

    NOT A TEACHER

    I've heard of buzzkill in US English meaning something or someone that has a dampening or depressing effect on a situation. I would need someone from the US to put it into a typical sentence, because I can only put it into a UK English one and it would sound wrong! But anyway, it means killing (putting a stop to) the 'buzz' (a feeling of excitement or energy).

    Again, we'd need an American to say whether buzzkiller makes sense as well as buzzkill.

  4. #4
    kyungmin is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: buzzkiller

    Thank you for your kind reply. It's funny expression.
    I wish I were American..
    Anyway it's very helpful for me to understand.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: buzzkiller

    The British English (approximate) equivalent is 'wet blanket'.

    b

  6. #6
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    Default Re: buzzkiller

    We have wet blanket too.

    While only a person can be a wet blanket, a person or a situation can be a buzz kill.

    You watch your team make a spectacular play. There is great celebration. Then you find out that there was a foul on the play and it doesn't count. That could be a buzz kill.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. #7
    TheEditor is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: buzzkiller

    That's my understanding of buzzkill (and by extension, buzzkiller), too.

    Imagine a celebratory party going on at a college campus after the basketball team wins an important game. A student with no interest in sports walks in and says, "Don't stay up too late, guys -- we've all got semester exams on Monday."

    That's a buzzkill -- spoken by a buzzkiller.

    Similar phrases would include killjoy, stick-in-the-mud and party pooper, although buzzkill(er) in particular conveys a sense of putting a sudden damper on the happy mood.
    Last edited by TheEditor; 03-Dec-2011 at 13:14.

  8. #8
    Wicked Pissah's Avatar
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    Default Re: buzzkiller

    I had a friend nicknamed "Buzz". I killed him.

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