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    #1

    If she accept the offer, she is as much as a fool.

    "Yesterday, the company offered a job to her with the promise of $ 100,000 salary.
    I don't know if she accepted the offer. But considering her work experience,
    If she accepted offer, she is as much as a fool."

    Is the underlined sentence right in context?

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: If she accept the offer, she is as much as a fool.

    No. It has no real meaning. Perhaps it should read something like::

    If she accepted the offer, she is as big a fool as I always thought.

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    #3

    Re: If she accept the offer, she is as much as a fool.

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    No. It has no real meaning. Perhaps it should read something like::

    If she accepted the offer, she is as big a fool as I always thought.
    Sorry, I mean "If she accepted the offer, she is no better than a fool."
    Is it correct?

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    #4

    Re: If she accept the offer, she is as much as a fool.

    And my question is that in subjunctive mood,

    "If S + simple past ~ , S + would, could + simple form ~." --> Untrue meaning.

    but, in below situation,

    "If S + simple past ~, S + what kind of verb types can be used?" --> True meaning.

    I guess simple present can be used, and is simple past or future possible?

    If it is, could you give me an example?

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