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Thread: present prefect

  1. #1
    hooshdar3 is offline Banned
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    Default present prefect

    Hello.
    "If you have moved your king, you can'y castle".That's what GM Seirawan says.

    1)What tense is he refering to in his If-clause?
    2)Why doesn't he say:"if you move your king you cannot castle"?, refering to a future tense?

  2. #2
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    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: present prefect

    Quote Originally Posted by hooshdar3 View Post
    Hello.
    "If you have moved your king, you can't castle".That's what GM Seirawan says.

    1)What tense is he referring to in his If-clause?
    2)Why doesn't he say:"if you move your king you cannot castle"?, refering to a future tense?
    1) Look at the title of your post.
    2) Because he chose to write it that way.

  3. #3
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: present prefect

    Quote Originally Posted by hooshdar3 View Post
    2)Why doesn't he say:"if you move your king you cannot castle"?, refering to a future tense?
    There is no future tense involved in either 'if you have moved' or 'if you move'. In fact, English has no future tense.

    When we refer to future time in an if-clause, it is inappropriate to use will with the meaning of certainty in a situation in which there is uncertainty. We therefore use an unmarked (present) tense form, simple, progressive or perfect.

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    hooshdar3 is offline Banned
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    Default Re: present prefect

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    There is no future tense involved in either 'if you have moved' or 'if you move'. In fact, English has no future tense.

    When we refer to future time in an if-clause, it is inappropriate to use will with the meaning of certainty in a situation in which there is uncertainty. We therefore use an unmarked (present) tense form, simple, progressive or perfect.
    So it has the same meaning as if he said "If you move your king, you will not be able to castle"?
    We have studied only 3 conditionals in school!

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