Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Judicial topic

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Finland
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2011
    • Posts: 3
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Judicial topic

    In my uni we took the topic about punishment and so on. So I was asked to find the difference between words "accusation" , "prosecution" , "charge" and "indictment". There is a vague explanation in dictionaries. I'd like to ask about refinements and details of it. Thank you
    And this is not only my homework! I need to know the difference because I just don't know which word to use when describing the court case for example. If you can show the shades of definition please help

  1. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,167
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: Judicial topic

    What parts of the dictionary definitions are 'vague'? Try using the words in sentences, and posting them here for our comments.

  2. JohnParis's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Oct 2011
    • Posts: 774
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: Judicial topic

    Hello Timokaaskala

    Each of your terms is extensively covered by the Oxford and other online dictionaries. The definitions are not vague, but the legal concepts behind them may be difficult for non-native English speakers. It's important to note that judicial and criminal systems differs from country to country and meanings of certain words may as well. The four words you have given as examples are typical of criminal prosecutions in some western nations.
    Our job here, however, is the discussion of the English language. Nuances of legal terminology might be best left to professionals of the law.
    Last edited by JohnParis; 04-Dec-2011 at 14:28. Reason: double word

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Finland
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2011
    • Posts: 3
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: Judicial topic

    You know, in fact they all mean if in general something against a person in a trial. But as far as I can understand charge is more universal word which can be used to express other three words. I try to say that there is the defference of what I should use when I am blamed in the street and in a trial.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,167
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: Judicial topic

    Quote Originally Posted by timokaaskala View Post
    ... as far as I can understand 'charge' is a more universal word which can be used to express the other three words.
    Not necessarily, as JohnParis suggested.
    I try to say that there is the defference of a difference between what I should use when I am blamed (?) in the street and in a trial.
    As I said, "Try using the words in sentences, and posting them here for our comments".

  4. JohnParis's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Oct 2011
    • Posts: 774
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: Judicial topic

    timokaaskala

    You can't make sweeping statements such as "charge is more universal word which can be used to express the other three words." You are not correct.

    Please take 5jj's suggestion and write full sentences so that we can help you further.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Finland
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2011
    • Posts: 3
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: Judicial topic

    Sorry if I seemed rude. Now I got the rules of the site.
    Well. Ok, the definition isn't vague but let's see it in examples:
    1. She thought he was the one who broke her car so she cried out the accusation
    (examples will be a bit stupid, I just want to see the difference in usage)
    2. The firts time he got to know the charge which was brought against him in a trial
    3. The indictment was written the next day (orsmthlike this)
    I dont know where I should use "prosecution".. Maybe... Now. Can't imagine.
    Just put charge/indictment/prosecution/accusation where they are more appropriate

  5. Ouisch's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 4,142
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: Judicial topic

    Under U.S. common law, an indictment is a formal accusation that a person has committed a crime. Some indictments consist of many different parts, or "counts", if the accused has committed multiple crimes.

    Ex: "We the jury find the defendent, Charles Manson, guilty on count one of the indictment, murder in the first degree of Sharon Tate. We further find him guilty on count two of the indictment, murder in the first degree of Abigail Folger."


    A charge is an official accusation made by the police when they arrest you. If, for example, you are stopped by a police officer for jaywalking, he will first accuse (that is, he will tell you why he stopped you) you of improperly crossing the street. Most likely he will explain why what you did was dangerous and let you go without charging you. However, if you run away from him while he is talking to you and when he finally catches you finds that you are frantically chewing on a rock of cocaine, trying to swallow it, he will put handcuffs on you and announce "You are being charged with resisting arrest and attempting to destroy evidence." You'll be taken to jail and when you appear in front of a judge it will be up to him to decide whether or not you will be indicted and held for trial, or allowed to pay a fine and be released.

Similar Threads

  1. [General] Judicial Salutations
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20-Apr-2010, 06:00
  2. Topic sentence: Topic and the controlling idea.
    By sara88 in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-Nov-2009, 20:58
  3. [Essay] topic
    By san2612 in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 27-Jun-2009, 06:34
  4. judicial framework
    By Armenoid in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24-Jun-2008, 22:58
  5. judicial
    By ieasy in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20-Oct-2006, 20:56

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •