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  1. #1
    ridvann is offline Member
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    come closer and comparative

    Hello,

    'I came closer to the car'.I would like to compare each other but I don't know how.Please help me.

    I would like you to tell me that it is correct or not.

    -I came closer to the car much than you did.

    -I came closer to the car than you did.

    -I came to the car closer than you did.

    -I came close to the car much than you did.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is online now Moderator
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    Re: come closer and comparative

    "I came closer to the car than you did."
    This is the only correct option.

  3. #3
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    Re: come closer and comparative

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "I came closer to the car than you did."
    This is the only correct option.
    What about "I came much closer to the car than you did"?

    John came close to the car.
    You came closer than John.
    Jane came even closer than you, but I came much closer to the car than anyone.

    Apologies - I have re-read the original question and realised that "much" was not a required part of the answer. My example above still stands as it contains comparatives.

    However, as a basic answer "I came closer to the car than you did" is the simplest comparative statement.

  4. #4
    ridvann is offline Member
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    Re: come closer and comparative

    If we construct a sentence as I write below, do you think that may cause a semantic shift?

    Yesterday, Sally spoke to the teacher more sharply than she always speaks. (It is grammatically correct)

    -Yesterday, Sally spoke more sharply to the teacher than she always speaks. (Can you please tell the that it is correct or not grammatically?)

  5. #5
    ridvann is offline Member
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    Re: come closer and comparative

    Please can you check? :(

  6. #6
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: come closer and comparative

    Quote Originally Posted by ridvann View Post
    If we construct a sentence as I write below, do you think that may cause a semantic shift?

    Yesterday, Sally spoke to the teacher more sharply than she always speaks. (It is grammatically correct)

    -Yesterday, Sally spoke more sharply to the teacher than she always speaks. (Can you please tell the that it is correct or not grammatically?)
    "Always" doesn't really work here as you have just said that this is not how she always speaks to the teacher, because yesterday she spoke to her in a different way.

    Yesterday, Sally spoke more sharply than usual to the teacher.
    Yesterday, Sally spoke more sharply to the teacher than she had ever spoken to him/her before.

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