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Thread: Like hell

  1. #1
    easybreakable's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Like hell

    I was wondering about this expression, "like hell".

    Is it acceptable to be used in a casual lady to lady conversation? I feel like it's graceless, still I hear it too frequently!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Like hell

    Quote Originally Posted by easybreakable View Post
    I was wondering about this expression, "like hell".

    Is it acceptable to be used in a casual lady to lady conversation? I feel like it's graceless, still I hear it too frequently!
    This is a cultural question more than a language question. The answer is, it's acceptable in some cultures, but not in others.

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    Default Re: Like hell

    In BrE, I don't think you will find many people that think you should speak in one way to a man, but in a more delicate way to a woman. Some conversation topics might not be entirely appropriate for one gender or another, but that's more to do with their interest in the topic, not the actual words used.

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    Default Re: Like hell

    There are very few people who find "hell" a very offensive word these days. However, if you're around someone who does, male or female, then do your best to avoid it.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    Default Re: Like hell

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    There are very few people who find "hell" a very offensive word these days. However, if you're around someone who does, male or female, then do your best to avoid it.
    I agree that if you already know that someone finds any word offensive, then it's only polite to avoid it, but I wouldn't avoid any particular word (apart from out and out swearing) with people whose feelings are unknown to me.

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    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Like hell

    Quote Originally Posted by easybreakable View Post
    I was wondering about this expression, "like hell".

    Is it acceptable to be used in a casual lady to lady conversation? I feel like it's graceless, still I hear it too frequently!

    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) I most respectfully suggest that you not use this word.

    (2) I suggest that you keep this word in your vocabulary so that you can use it

    only in very special circumstances. If you use this word all the time, people

    will soon not pay attention to that word. But if you usually do not use it and then

    one day you do use it, people will be shocked. You will really get their attention.
    Last edited by TheParser; 06-Dec-2011 at 21:40.

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    Default Re: Like hell

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    (3) I suggest that you do use especially courteous language to the ladies. Some ladies say that they want to be treated like men, but in my opinion they really do not. For example, they still expect men to open the door for them. And when a man doesn't, most of them (in my opinion) feel hurt. Men should be gentlemen -- in their speech and in their conduct when dealing with men and women. You should be especially careful in your speech with the ladies, for they might misinterpret what you are saying. Here in the States, many men are afraid to congratulate a woman on her appearance that day, for she might think he is trying to be romantic toward her.
    I am afraid that many of the American and British females I know would feel offended and patronised by that attitude, particularly the words I have coloured blue. Most people I know (male and female) expect to be believed, not 'interpreted'.

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    Default Re: Like hell

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I am afraid that many of the American and British females I know would feel offended and patronised by that attitude, particularly the words I have coloured blue. Most people I know (male and female) expect to be believed, not 'interpreted'.

    I believe in what I said, but I realize that this is strictly a language forum. So I have

    edited my post to stay solely on the topic of "hell."

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    symaa is offline Member
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    Default Re: Like hell

    This is a cultural question more than a language question. The answer is, it's acceptable in some cultures, but not in others.

    Some ladies say that they want to be treated like men, but in my opinion they really do not.
    I am afraid that many of the American and British females I know would feel offended and patronised by that attitude, particularly the words I have coloured blue. Most people I know (male and female) expect to be believed, not 'interpreted'.


    Actually, it differs from one culture to another. Once my teacher who was student in America, was sitting at the bus, he saw a women ''elderly'' standing up, to his mind he thought that it is politely to let his seat to that women. So, he told her that she could have his seat, but unfortunately she misinterpreted him and got angry.

    In Eastern culture, it is considered as a polite gesture and a good manner,a way of showing respect... (giving up your seat to a girl or a women, letting her go first through the door etc, giving her the priority in various social situations) And this expression "Ladies first" "les femmes d'abord" is heard many times.
    But it remains a matter of culture.


    Sorry if this a bit out of topic.

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    Default Re: Like hell

    [QUOTE=symaa;831324] Once my teacher who was student in America, was sitting at the bus, he saw a women ''elderly'' standing up, to his mind he thought that it is politely to let his seat to that women. So, he told her that she could have his seat, but unfortunately she misinterpreted him and got angry.


    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) How strange! I do not have a car, so I either walk or take the bus.

    (2) From my experience, female senior citizens very much appreciate such gestures on the part of men.

    (3) In fact, some expect it. I once saw a female senior citizen walk up to two men who were in their twenties and tell them with her hand gesture to vacate their seats for her. They complied without saying anything.

    (4) Of course, I shall not name it, but I read that in a certain country famous for
    supposedly having respect for older people (such as I), many of the youth there no longer honor that tradition. The government, I hear, is trying to teach the youth better manners.

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