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Thread: 'of' and 's'

  1. #11
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: 'of' and 's'

    If there is no pause of any sort after 'Tom', then #2 is more likely.

  2. #12
    aysaa is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: 'of' and 's'

    First of all, I would like to thanks all of you ,and I would like to ask one more question.

    (4) Well, I think there is a big difference:

    (a) In "A friend of Tom/Tom's," please notice the word "a." (or "one").

    Thus, if you choose to say "A friend of Tom's," that means something like:

    One friend out of Tom's friends.
    By The Parser

    I have understood that we can say: A friend of Tom or a friend of Tom's

    Two friends of Tom's (It is ok).....It means 'two friends out of Tom's friends.

    But what about mentioning about two or much more friends?

    -Two friends of Tom. Is that ok or must we put 's' after Tom?

  3. #13
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    Default Re: 'of' and 's'

    No, you can still say "of Tom."

    The "double genitive" (A friend of Tom's, an old colleague of my father's) is common but not mandatory.

    You don't have to change "Tom" to "Tom's" based on the number of friends.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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