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  1. #1
    hessamel is offline Newbie
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    Post I have a question

    Hello,

    please tell me what are differences between "When you know her" and "When you get to know her".

    thank you so much

  2. #2
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is online now VIP Member
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    Default Re: I have a question

    Quote Originally Posted by hessamel View Post
    Hello,

    please tell me what are differences between "When you know her" and "When you get to know her".

    thank you so much
    Without context, it's impossible to say.
    You can't just "not know" someone one minute, and 'know" them the next. The process of going from not knowing someone to knowing them is called "getting to know someone."

    "You'll like her when/once/after you get to know her" and "You'll like her when you know her" woud mean the same thing in most contexts, but the first is better because it communicates your meaning better.

    PS: It's better to use full sentences as examples. You've given two dependent clauses, which could change meaning depending on the (missing) main clause.

  3. #3
    sumon.'s Avatar
    sumon. is offline Member
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    Red face Re: I have a question

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    You can't just "not know" someone one minute, and 'know" them the next. .
    Hi Mr. Raymott;

    What do you mean by the sentence marked by quote?
    Using 2 negative forms in the first clues made it to me not understandable . Is it
    possible to use "before" before "one minute"?
    Thank you in advance...

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: I have a question

    Quote Originally Posted by sumon. View Post
    Hi Mr. Raymott;

    What do you mean by the sentence marked by quote?
    I used the quotes in an attempt to make the meaning simpler. They're not necessary.
    "You can't just "not know" someone one minute, and 'know" them the next." = "A person cannot be unknown by you one minute and be known by you in the next minute."
    My point was that it takes some time to get to know someone - and my comment applies to this meaning of "know". "Know" is a difficult word in English.

    Using 2 negative forms in the first clues made it to me not understandable.
    I'm sorry about that, but if I need two negatives in my sentence to express my meaning, I have to use two negatives. You will eventually need to learn how to read sentences with two negatives. It will usually be the negation of a simlar sentence with one negative.

    "Jack: I didn't hear you.
    Jane: You're standing right here. You can't have not heard me!" (It's not possible that you did not hear me. You must have heard me.)

    Is it possible to use "before" before "one minute"?
    Yes, would you like to try it?
    Thank you in advance...
    R.

  5. #5
    sumon.'s Avatar
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    Default Re: I have a question

    Yes, I would .
    I t was unknown to me just before 2 minutes .

    Again, thank you for your wonderful explanation and advice .....

  6. #6
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: I have a question

    Quote Originally Posted by sumon. View Post
    Yes, I would .
    I t was unknown to me just before 2 minutes .

    Again, thank you for your wonderful explanation and advice .....
    No you can't say that. "It was unknown to me until two minutes ago."
    It's possible to say, "It was unknown to me before two minutes ago", but this is not as common. I'd suggest to use "until".

    A possible good sentence with "before one minute" is:
    "Place the test tube in the centrifuge for one minute. Don't open it before one minute [elapses], or the results will be unreliable."

  7. #7
    hessamel is offline Newbie
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    Smile Re: I have a question

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Without context, it's impossible to say.
    You can't just "not know" someone one minute, and 'know" them the next. The process of going from not knowing someone to knowing them is called "getting to know someone."

    "You'll like her when/once/after you get to know her" and "You'll like her when you know her" woud mean the same thing in most contexts, but the first is better because it communicates your meaning better.

    PS: It's better to use full sentences as examples. You've given two dependent clauses, which could change meaning depending on the (missing) main clause.
    thank you for help

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