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  1. #1
    vcolts is offline Member
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    Exclamation Appositive or Reduced Relative Clause?

    Ex1: It's all about how you think, how you approach.
    Ex2: It's all about how to think, how to approach.

    Question 1: Are both sentences grammatically correct? Are they examples of appositives or are they reduced relative clauses?

    Question 2: IF they are appositives:


    Websites on internet say that appositives include a noun or a noun phrase.

    The clauses in red are dependant clauses (practically not a phrase). They are okay because they contain a pronoun?
    The phrases in blue do not contain a noun or even a pronoun.

    Is there a website that indicates that appositives can also contain clauses and phrases that do not contain a noun?

  2. #2
    Preceptor is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Appositive or Reduced Relative Clause?

    1. Both sentences are grammatically correct. However, the first sentence is correct only if the writer is directly addressing someone.

    2. Both would be considered relative clauses used as the object of the preposition 'about.'

  3. #3
    vcolts is offline Member
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    Default Re: Appositive or Reduced Relative Clause?

    Quote Originally Posted by Preceptor View Post
    1. Both sentences are grammatically correct. However, the first sentence is correct only if the writer is directly addressing someone.

    2. Both would be considered relative clauses used as the object of the preposition 'about.'
    Q1. What you mean by "the object of the preposition about?"

    Q2. Isn't the construction the following?:
    It's all about how you think, (which is) how you view.

  4. #4
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    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Appositive or Reduced Relative Clause?

    Quote Originally Posted by Preceptor View Post
    1. Both sentences are grammatically correct. However, the first sentence is correct only if the writer is directly addressing someone.
    If 'you' is thought of as the informal alternative to 'one', then nobody is being addressed.

    2. Both would be considered relative clauses used as the object of the preposition 'about.'I cannot see how they can be considered relative clauses; semantically they resemble wh-questions. I would label them (if I had to) as prepositional complements.
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  5. #5
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    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Appositive or Reduced Relative Clause?

    Quote Originally Posted by vcolts View Post

    Is there a website that indicates that appositives can also contain clauses and phrases that do not contain a noun?
    "Apposition is a grammatical construction in which two elements, normally noun phrases, are placed side by side" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apposition

    This definition, since it describes apposition as normally containing noun phrases, does tend to indicate that the author believes that some examples of apposition do not.

    I'm not sure whether that advances the argument or not.

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