Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Fujibei is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    27
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default I hope you get well soon.

    Which of the folowing is more common?
    1) I hope you'll get well soon.
    2) I hope you get well soon.

    I remember reading somewhere that 2) is more common. If that's true, I would like to know the reason why.

  2. #2
    Preceptor is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    61
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I hope you get well soon.

    The second sentence is more common because it is an approximation of sloppy speech. The technically correct statement is, 'I hope you will be well soon.' The verb 'get' is an American catchall used as a substitute for numerous other verbs. In that you are hoping the person will be well in the near future, the verb must be in the future tense. Hence, 'I hope you'll get well soon' is the correct version of the sentence.

  3. #3
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,168
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I hope you get well soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Preceptor View Post
    . In that you are hoping the person will be well in the near future, the verb must be in the future tense. Hence, 'I hope you'll get well soon' is the correct version of the sentence.
    This is not correct, because
    1. There is no future tense in English; there are merely several ways of expressing the future;
    2. The use of the present simple after 'hope' is natural and correct; the use of the modal will is also possible, but it is not 'more correct'.

    So, 'I hope you get well soon' is fine. 'I hope you will be well soon' is also fine, but it is not more 'technically correct'.

  4. #4
    TheParser is online now Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    4,924
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I hope you get well soon.

    I would like to know the reason why.


    NOT A TEACHER


    (1) I also would like to know.

    (2) I have checked my books, and none of them had "the" answer.

    (3) My books tell me that we have this choice:

    (a) I hope (that) you may get well soon. (modal)

    (b) I hope (that) you will get well soon. (for the sake of simplicity, many books refer to this as the future tense)

    (c) I hope (that) you get well soon. (present tense)

    (4) My books tell me that 3a is the most formal. Of course, I do not know, but probably few native speakers in 2011 speak/write this version. But it is rather elegant, isn't it!

    3b is certainly correct.

    3c is, as the other posters have said, probably the most common. Why? Well, as

    one poster suggested, people speak fast. Why say "I hope that you will get well

    soon" when you can simply say "I hope you get well soon"?

    (5) When you speak English with native speakers, you might consider using 3c. If

    you use 3a your listener will find it rather unusual; if you use 3b, your listener may

    consider it a bit formal since most (?) native speakers are accustomed to hearing

    3c. When you speak English, you want your listener to pay attention to your ideas;

    you do NOT want your listener to be distracted by your grammar. For example,

    "correct" grammar is "It is I," but since most (almost all?) native speakers nowadays

    say "It is me," if you say "I," your listener may stop paying attention to your ideas and

    start paying more attention to your grammar. (In fact, nowadays many native

    speakers now think "It is I" is wrong!)
    Last edited by TheParser; 14-Dec-2011 at 12:07.

  5. #5
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    42,774
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I hope you get well soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fujibei View Post
    Which of the folowing is more common?
    1) I hope you'll get well soon.
    2) I hope you get well soon.

    I remember reading somewhere that 2) is more common. If that's true, I would like to know the reason why.
    I think people may use the second as it makes the recovery sound closer.

    I'd also like to say that there's nothing at all wrong with the second. We commonly use present forms to talk about the future- there's no obligation to use will for everything in the near future.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] Hope
    By sophie gilbert in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Apr-2011, 19:33
  2. hope and wish
    By Bide in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 25-Mar-2011, 02:58
  3. I hope she likes... vs I hope she will like..
    By bleiva in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 29-Jan-2011, 14:19
  4. hope for the better / best
    By natasha in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 20-May-2009, 02:47
  5. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 22-Oct-2007, 19:04

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •