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Thread: ty endings.

  1. #1
    EuroTeacher is offline Newbie
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    Default ty endings.

    Hi.

    I'm a new teacher who recently did a Cambridge CELTA.

    As part of the course it was mandatory to learn (and teach) the phonetic script (British English). I've kind of got to grips with it (as when I started my course I was an almost complete beginner).

    Anyway, soon I have to teach students the difference between the endings of some of the numbers (which they regularly mispronounce) - for example; thirteen and thirty.

    Upon putting 'thirty' into the Cambridge dictionary and looking at the phonetic transcription I notice that the ending is coming up as /i/ - this isn't a sound that was covered on the CELTA course (although I was told that there were 44 sounds in total and we 'learnt all 44'). So for the past 2 months I've been teaching my students the same. Now I'm faced with an 'extra' sound.

    I guess the sound in question is somewhere between the long /i:/ sound in 'eat' and the short /ɪ/ sound in 'it'. So i'm initially wondering why this sound isn't shown on the Cambridge English official phonetic chart (and various others). As I guess having stated that there are 'only 44 sounds' I've now got to kind of say.........oh by the way, there's another.

    Thanks for any insight.

    * Yes, I also know this sound is on the end of lots of adjectives too (naughty etc.) Which makes it's 'omission' even more baffling.


  2. #2
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    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: ty endings.

    Quote Originally Posted by EuroTeacher View Post
    Hi.

    I'm a new teacher who recently did a Cambridge CELTA.

    As part of the course it was mandatory to learn (and teach) the phonetic script (British English). I've kind of got to grips with it (as when I started my course I was an almost complete beginner).

    Anyway, soon I have to teach students the difference between the endings of some of the numbers (which they regularly mispronounce) - for example; thirteen and thirty.

    Upon putting 'thirty' into the Cambridge dictionary and looking at the phonetic transcription I notice that the ending is coming up as /i/ - this isn't a sound that was covered on the CELTA course (although I was told that there were 44 sounds in total and we 'learnt all 44'). So for the past 2 months I've been teaching my students the same. Now I'm faced with an 'extra' sound.

    I guess the sound in question is somewhere between the long /i:/ sound in 'eat' and the short /ɪ/ sound in 'it'. So i'm initially wondering why this sound isn't shown on the Cambridge English official phonetic chart (and various others). As I guess having stated that there are 'only 44 sounds' I've now got to kind of say.........oh by the way, there's another.

    Thanks for any insight.

    * Yes, I also know this sound is on the end of lots of adjectives too (naughty etc.) Which makes it's 'omission' even more baffling.
    If "phonetic script (British English)" is based on IPA, and uses only those symbols needed for British English, then yes, since a /i:/ is a lengthened /i/, a /i/ would, in your system be a shortened /i:/
    But does the Cambridge Dicitonary use "phonetic script (British English)" or does it use IPA?

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: ty endings.

    This is what they use: Help - Cambridge Dictionary Online

  4. #4
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    Default Re: ty endings.

    /i/ (as in 'happy') and /u/ as in (to Africa') do not appear on some charts of English phonemes, because they are not phonemes. No minimal pairs exist for /i/ - /i:/, /ɪ/ - /i/, /ʊ/ - /u/, or /u/ - /u:/
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


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