Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: I says

  1. #1
    suprunp's Avatar
    suprunp is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    526
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default I says

    Have I caught it right that at the end of the audio file he says: "I says"?
    I says.mp3
    (UKBlack: with Eddie Nestor Weds 21st December 2011)

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,509
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I says

    Quote Originally Posted by suprunp View Post
    Have I caught it right that at the end of the audio file he says: "I says"?
    I says.mp3
    (UKBlack: with Eddie Nestor Weds 21st December 2011)

    Thanks.
    Yes, he says "I says".

  3. #3
    ~Mav~ is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Hungarian
      • Home Country:
      • Europe
      • Current Location:
      • Europe
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    341
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I says

    Apparently, some people find it "cool" to use the third-person singular present tense suffix after I + verb. Eg., "I loves you." (I've even come across with, "I loveth you. " I assume the person who wrote this wanted to be "super cool". ), "I has it." I have noticed this with a bunch of native English speakers, mostly American girls.
    Is this really "trendy"? How do these sentences ("I loves you.", "I loveth you.", "I has it.", etc.) sound to an educated American?

  4. #4
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,509
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I says

    The speaker in suprunp's post is a black British person.

  5. #5
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,509
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I says

    Quote Originally Posted by ~Mav~ View Post
    Apparently, some people find it "cool" to use the third-person singular present tense suffix after I + verb. Eg., "I loves you." (I've even come across with, "I loveth you. " I assume the person who wrote this wanted to be "super cool". ), "I has it." I have noticed this with a bunch of native English speakers, mostly American girls.
    Is this really "trendy"? How does ? these sentences ("I loves you.", "I loveth you.", "I has it.", etc.) sound to an educated American?
    Bhai.

  6. #6
    ~Mav~ is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Hungarian
      • Home Country:
      • Europe
      • Current Location:
      • Europe
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    341
    Post Thanks / Like

    Question Re: I says

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    The speaker in suprunp's post is a black British person.
    Those American girls I was referring to were Caucasian, in their early twenties. (Mostly.)
    Anyway, how does a sentence like this, "I loves you." - or any other sentence using this structure - sound to a native English speaker?

  7. #7
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,509
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I says

    Quote Originally Posted by ~Mav~ View Post
    Those American girls I was referring to were Caucasian, in their early twenties. (Mostly.)
    Anyway, how does a sentence like this, "I loves you." - or any other sentence using this structure - sound to a Native English speaker?
    It sounds like playing with language to me.

  8. #8
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,168
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I says

    Quote Originally Posted by ~Mav~ View Post
    Anyway, how does a sentence like this, "I loves you." - or any other sentence using this structure - sound to a Native English speaker?
    If it's genuine dialect, (there are several BrE dialects in which the conjugation is I/you/(s)he/we they loves, others in which it is I/you/(s)he/we/they love), then I have nothing against it. After all, I speak a dialect - mine just happens to be slightly dated standard BrE RP.

    If it's put on as a mark of solidarity for or against something, then it irritates me. That's just my personal dislike of artificiality

  9. #9
    ~Mav~ is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Hungarian
      • Home Country:
      • Europe
      • Current Location:
      • Europe
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    341
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I says

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    It sounds like playing with language to me.
    So, in proper context (for example, in a friendly conversation among native speakers), would you NOT deem it to be incorrect grammar? (As for, "I loveth you.", then I'd suggest, "I loveth thee." - just to be "stylistic." ) So far, I have thought that this is definitely incorrect, but if you approve it, I'll concede.


    *Edit

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    If it's genuine dialect, (there are several BrE dialects in which the conjugation is I/you/(s)he/we they loves, others in which it is I/you/(s)he/we/they love), then I have nothing against it.
    I see. Thank you for your answer.

  10. #10
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,509
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I says

    Quote Originally Posted by ~Mav~ View Post
    So, in proper context (for example, in a friendly conversation among native speakers), would you NOT deem it to be incorrect grammar? (As for, "I loveth you.", then I'd suggest, "I loveth thee." - just to be "stylistic." ) So far, I have thought that this is definitely incorrect, but if you approve it, I'll concede.
    It's not grammatically correct, things we say to each other in private don't have to be.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •