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  1. #11
    NewHopeR is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: what does "to Iowa caucus" mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Only insofar as the that is where it ends.
    G.O.P. Race Still Unsettled in Sprint to Iowa Caucus
    Look this is simple -- although some the imagery seems to be from horse-racing, with horses being unsettled and sprinting to the finish.
    Members of the GOP are having a race. They are sprinting to a finish which is at the Iowa Caucus. The race is still unsettled, which I'd guess means that the leadership keeps changing, there is no clear leader, candidates make a dash then fall back.
    The winner is the person who is leading when the Iowa caucus takes place. They are not actually physically sprinting to the Iowa caucus. I don't think they even need to have reached the Caucus before it starts.

    You need to read up about the US electoral system and what the state Caucuses do, and what the significance is to candidates if you want a 100% clear understanding of that article.
     Excellent!

    Crystal clear now.

    Thank you. Thank you all.

  2. #12
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: what does "to Iowa caucus" mean?

    The sprint to the Iowa Caucus wasn't like the 24 Hours of Le Mans - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (in the days when it was an actual sprint... though now I think of it it'd make for a good spectator sport). The confusion arises from the fact much of the language of what is to come uses spatial metaphors (like 'ahead', 'target'. 'destination' and so on.)

    b

  3. #13
    riquecohen's Avatar
    riquecohen is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: what does "to Iowa caucus" mean?

    Note that there are more than 1700 Iowa caucuses. When we refer to the Iowa caucus, we are targeting only one of the many precincts in which the caucuses are held. See SoothingDave's useful link in post #3.

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