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Thread: freak out

  1. #11
    keannu's Avatar
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    Default Re: freak out

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Basically it's a very strong, but temporary, expression of emotion. It carries no sense of permanently going mad.
    I'm really sorry I don't know what emotion it is even though I have thought about it in many ways. Human beings share same emotions, so we Koreans must have it. I will try to think about your definition again and again through any meditation or whatever.
    Thanks a lot!!!

  2. #12
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: freak out

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    I'm really sorry I don't know what emotion it is even though I have thought about it in many ways. Human beings share same emotions, so we Koreans must have it. I will try to think about your definition again and again through any meditation or whatever.
    Thanks a lot!!!
    It's not one particular kind of emotion. As konungursvia said, it's an expression of emotion. It's a kind of expression, not a kind of emotion.

    Please take a look at the videos I posted links to. They show what freaking out is.

    There may be differences between users. Raymott seems to disagree that freaking out can be a result of joy. He says he would call it something else. However, I have come across such usage (my own usage doesn't matter) -- the video of the excited girl is not a result of just typing "freak out" into the search box, but of a considered search.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: freak out

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    I Human beings share the same emotions, so we Koreans must have it.
    I am not so sure that we do. I think that we may be culturally conditioned , at least in so far as we can recognise, and talk about, certain emotions. One example of this (I think) is 'face' - if it is correct to speak about that as an emotion. From what I have read and heard, the concept of 'face' is more significant in some Asian cultures than it is in some European/North American cultures.

    I am not too happy about thinking of 'freaking out' as an emotion, though I accept 'expression of emotion'. However, this may be just playing with words.

    If you read all the posts by native speakers - and birdeen's call - you'll have some idea of what 'freaking out' can suggest.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  4. #14
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    Default Re: freak out

    Thanks a lot for all of you! Now my long-held curiosity about "freak out" is gone, It was my prejudice that I have only stuck to its emotional aspects, not the expression. Now I realize it's the expression of outburst of any emotions(anger, anxiety, fear, etc). I couldn't find any common thing among those many emotions, but now you settled my confusion. I'm so grateful. I feel I'm getting way too much in this website than I expected.
    By the way, it's really funny to think about Korean's "face" concept as they stick to it so much , yes, probably 5jj is right, we think too much about "personal face" or "family face" that are like your personal pride or family pride. It's related to cultural or historical background that may be from confucianism. You shouldn't discolor your family's fame by failing to reach their standard in any social success or something.

    I am not so sure that we do. I think that we may be culturally conditioned , at least in so far as we can recognise, and talk about, certain emotions. One example of this (I think) is 'face' - if it is correct to speak about that as an emotion. From what I have read and heard, the concept of 'face' is more significant in some Asian cultures than it is in some European/North American cultures.
    Last edited by keannu; 28-Dec-2011 at 22:49.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: freak out

    Your M?sl?m (spelling note: History News Network) and Harvard family examples are, I think, relevant, but it is difficult, if not impossible, to know if the emotions felt are the same.

    I think we may run the risk of entering into culturally sensitive issues, so future posts should be about 'freak out' only. I know that I was the one who led us off the main track, so - my apologies. Let us stray no further.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  6. #16
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    Default Re: freak out

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    There may be differences between users. Raymott seems to disagree that freaking out can be a result of joy. He says he would call it something else. However, I have come across such usage (my own usage doesn't matter) -- the video of the excited girl is not a result of just typing "freak out" into the search box, but of a considered search.
    I'm sure you did a good search as usual, bc. I'm not disagreeing that "freaking out" can't be the result of joy if it is used that way in a population.
    In Australia, I have never heard it used that way. To me, in my subculture, it doesn't mean that. And since it's a slang term, one's use of a term has to determine its meaning. If it isn't used that way in Australia, for example, it doesn't mean that in Australia.

    Having said that, I can't swear that no one in Australia uses it that way, but I can swear that the original examples of being scared by a snake and panicking over your exam results are commonly understood situations in which one would "freak out". We used this term 30 or 40 years ago for that, and still do. Did you research lead you to an idea of when "joy" became one of those emotions over which one could "freak out", and in which sociolects it means that today?

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    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: freak out

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I'm sure you did a good search as usual, bc. I'm not disagreeing that "freaking out" can't be the result of joy if it is used that way in a population.
    In Australia, I have never heard it used that way. To me, in my subculture, it doesn't mean that. And since it's a slang term, one's use of a term has to determine its meaning. If it isn't used that way in Australia, for example, it doesn't mean that in Australia.

    Having said that, I can't swear that no one in Australia uses it that way, but I can swear that the original examples of being scared by a snake and panicking over your exam results are commonly understood situations in which one would "freak out". We used this term 30 or 40 years ago for that, and still do. Did you research lead you to an idea of when "joy" became one of those emotions over which one could "freak out", and in which sociolects it means that today?
    I didn't do any research on that. I just searched for a usage I knew existed. I don't know how old it is. I'm quite convinced all examples I have come across in my life are from AmE and recent.

    PS: Recent with respect to now, not the time I came across them.
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 29-Dec-2011 at 04:25.

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