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  1. #1
    o_cat Guest

    Default what does these two phrase mean?

    what does these two phrase mean
    "next to zero "?(In such a world, the chances that the human species would survive are next to zero, because emotions are the basic instrument of our survival and adaptation. )
    “True we consider ”(True we consider the length, shape, size, or texture, but an object's physical aspects are less important than what it has done or can do to us-hurt us, surprise us, anger us or make us joyful.)

    thanks

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default Next to zero

    Next to zero means very, very small. If the chances are next to zero they are very, very small.

    Re:

    • True, we consider the length, shape, size, or texture, but an object's physical aspects are less important than what it has done or can do to us-hurt us, surprise us, anger us or make us joyful.


    As you can see, I added some punctuation to your sentence. The first word does, no doubt, refer to something previously stated.

    Say:

    • What do these two phrases mean?


    :)

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    Default

    P.S. I like your kittycat.

    :D

  4. #4
    o_cat Guest

    Default

    Next to zero means very, very small. If the chances are next to zero they are very, very small.
    As you can see, I added some punctuation to your sentence. The first word does, no doubt, refer to something previously stated.
    i understand(how can i say it in oral english?)
    What do these two phrases mean?
    thank you:')
    P.S. I like your kittycat.
    thank you.

    P.S.how can i say so many thank you in different way?

  5. #5
    o_cat Guest

    Default Another question

    other two questions:
    1.put learning to productive ends in the sentence " The current crisis, it contends, does not derive from a legitimate desire to put learning to productive ends. "what does the phrase mean?
    2.Many Americans harbour a grossly distorted and exaggerated view of most of the risks surrounding food.
    Is harbour a verb in this sentence?if not,what does harbour mean?

  6. #6
    o_cat Guest

    Default

    There are some each phenomena you can count on, but the magnetic field, someday is not of them.
    what does this sentence mean?
    (I know the words's meaning ,but I cannot connect it into a sentence.Especially the phrase count on] and some day is not of them I cannot understand it quite well.)

    Ta:P

  7. #7
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by o_cat
    Next to zero means very, very small. If the chances are next to zero they are very, very small.
    As you can see, I added some punctuation to your sentence. The first word does, no doubt, refer to something previously stated.
    Since those two sentences aren't related to each other, they don't really go together. In any case, the first phrase is a real phrase. The other is simply three words that happen to be next to each other. 8)

    Quote Originally Posted by o_cat
    [
    i understand(how can i say it in oral english?)
    I'm afraid I don't understand what you are asking about. In any case, you don't need to say it that way. Say: How do I say it? Also, the phrase is spoken English.

    :)

  8. #8
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default Thank you

    Ways to say thank you:

    • Thanks.
      Thank you.
      Thanks a million.
      Thanks a bunch.
      Thanks to everybody.
      Thanks to all.
      Thanks to both of you.
      Many thanks.
      Thank you very much.


    Capitalization:

    • Capitalize proper nouns.
      Capitalize every word that starts a sentence.
      Capitalize I when it used as a pronoun.


    :)

  9. #9
    o_cat Guest

    Default

    o_cat wrote:
    I understand(how can i say it in oral english?)
    I'm afraid I don't understand what you are asking about. In any case, you don't need to say it that way. Say: How do I say it? Also, the phrase is spoken English.
    I mean I can follow the words you write.But how do I say it--I mean I can follow the words you write.--this sentence--in spoken English?

  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by o_cat
    There are some each phenomena you can count on, but the magnetic field, someday is not of them.
    what does this sentence mean?
    (I know the words's meaning ,but I cannot connect it into a sentence.Especially the phrase count on] and some day is not of them I cannot understand it quite well.)

    Ta:P
    It is no wonder that you have trouble with that sentence. It doesn't make sense. For one thing, neither someday nor each belong there. That sentence should read more like this:

    • There are some phenomena you can count on, but the magnetic field is not one of them.


    :)

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