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  1. #1
    Gabrielamisa is offline Newbie
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    Default 'Teaching register-related markers with (upper) intermediate learners''

    Well, this is the title I have got from my professor to write the paper for my first degree(TEACHING REGISTER-RELATED MARKERS WITH UPPER-INTERMEDIATE LEARNERS) , but I don't find any bibliography or any plan to start with. I know that the subject deals with teaching formal and informal English, but it is hard to find materials. Could you, please, help me?

  2. #2
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: 'Teaching register-related markers with (upper) intermediate learners''

    You'll find materials on Google Scholar- there's loads of stuff on teaching, ESL and linguistics.

    How do you understand register-related markers?

  3. #3
    Gabrielamisa is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: 'Teaching register-related markers with (upper) intermediate learners''

    well, I understand teaching formal-informal English....

  4. #4
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    Default Re: 'Teaching register-related markers with (upper) intermediate learners''

    Sociolinguistic interviews are an integral part of collecting data for sociolinguistic studies. There is an interviewer, who is conducting the study, and a subject, or informant, who is the interviewee. In order to get a grasp on a specific linguistic form and how it is used in the dialect of the subject, a variety of methods are used to elicit certain registers of speech. There are five different styles, ranging from formal to casual. The most formal style would be elicited by having the subject read a list of minimal pairs (MP). Minimal pairs are pairs of words that differ in only one phoneme, such as cat and bat. Having the subject read a word list (WL) will elicit a formal register, but generally not as formal as MP. The reading passage (RP) style is next down on the formal register, and the interview style (IS) is when an interviewer can finally get into eliciting a more casual speech from the subject. During the IS the interviewer can converse with the subject and try to draw out of them an even more casual sort of speech by asking him to recall childhood memories or maybe a near death experience, in which case the subject will get deeply involved with the story since strong emotions are often attached to these memories. Of course, the most sought after type of speech is the casual style (CS). This type of speech is difficult if not impossible to elicit because of the Observer's Paradox. The closest one might come to CS in an interview is when the subject is interrupted by a close friend or family member, or perhaps must answer the phone. CS is used in a completely unmonitored environment where the subject feels most comfortable and will use their natural vernacular without overtly thinking about it.

    Copied from wikipedia . You can also find more information by following this link.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: 'Teaching register-related markers with (upper) intermediate learners''

    Differences according to class

    Further information: Linguistic insecurity
    Sociolinguistics as a field distinct from dialectology was pioneered through the study of language variation in urban areas. Whereas dialectology studies the geographic distribution of language variation, sociolinguistics focuses on other sources of variation, among them class. Class and occupation are among the most important linguistic markers found in society. One of the fundamental findings of sociolinguistics, which has been hard to disprove, is that class and language variety are related. Members of the working class tend to speak less standard language, while the lower, middle, and upper middle class will in turn speak closer to the standard. However, the upper class, even members of the upper middle class, may often speak 'less' standard than the middle class.The looseness or tightness of a social network may affect speech patterns adopted by a speaker. For instance, Sylvie Dubois and Barbara Horvath found that speakers in one Cajun Louisiana community were more likely to pronounce English "th" [θ] as [t] (or [š] as [d]) if they participated in a relatively dense social network (i.e. had strong local ties and interacted with many other speakers in the community), and less likely if their networks were looser (i.e. fewer local ties) This is because not only class, but class aspirations, are important.

    Also from WIKIPEDIA.

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