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  1. #1
    NewHopeR is offline Senior Member
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    don'cha = don't you ? If so, "cha" is the dialect of "you"?

    Context:

    Reminds me of the story of the British Lord visiting America for the first time. He was asked by an ignorant Yank if he were British. His Lordship answered:

    "Why, if I were any more British you couldn't understand me at all, don'cha know."

  2. #2
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: don'cha = don't you ? If so, "cha" is the dialect of "you"?

    It's just a way of writing down the pronunciation used of don't you.

  3. #3
    NewHopeR is offline Senior Member
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    Re: don'cha = don't you ? If so, "cha" is the dialect of "you"?

    Thanks

  4. #4
    J&K Tutoring is offline Member
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    Re: don'cha = don't you ? If so, "cha" is the dialect of "you"?

    In spoken English, when a final t is followed by an initial y, the two syllables are linked together and spoken as a ch.

    "Aren't you going to school today, Johnny?" sounds like: "Arn choo going..."
    "Naw, I went yesterday." sounds like: "...I wen chesterday."

    In the same way, a final d and an initial y make a j sound.

    "Have you had your morning coffee?" sounds like: "Have you hajer morning coffee?"
    "I read your report," sounds like "I rejer report."

  5. #5
    NewHopeR is offline Senior Member
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    Re: don'cha = don't you ? If so, "cha" is the dialect of "you"?

    Quote Originally Posted by J&K Tutoring View Post
    In spoken English, when a final t is followed by an initial y, the two syllables are linked together and spoken as a ch.

    "Aren't you going to school today, Johnny?" sounds like: "Arn choo going..."
    "Naw, I went yesterday." sounds like: "...I wen chesterday."

    In the same way, a final d and an initial y make a j sound.

    "Have you had your morning coffee?" sounds like: "Have you hajer morning coffee?"
    "I read your report," sounds like "I rejer report."

    Cool.
    Gracias.

  6. #6
    BobSmith is offline Senior Member
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    Re: don'cha = don't you ? If so, "cha" is the dialect of "you"?

    Quote Originally Posted by J&K Tutoring View Post
    "Aren't you going to school today, Johnny?" sounds like: "Arn choo going..." - This is exactly how I say it.

    "Naw, I went yesterday." sounds like: "...I wen chesterday." - This is not how I say it. It sounds more like wen' yesterday. I tried others such as "I ate yogurt", doesn't come out like "I a-chogurt", more like "I aid yogurt". Any idea why?
    Any

  7. #7
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: don'cha = don't you ? If so, "cha" is the dialect of "you"?

    I wouldn't say a "ch" in those cases either. I think it may be a matter that this phenomenon only happens with the word "you." (or perhaps with the "ooo" sound)

  8. #8
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    Over the top is offline Member
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    Re: don'cha = don't you ? If so, "cha" is the dialect of "you"?

    Is 'want' is pronounced something like 'watch/?

  9. #9
    J&K Tutoring is offline Member
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    Re: don'cha = don't you ? If so, "cha" is the dialect of "you"?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobSmith View Post
    Any
    Maybe you have a cold?

  10. #10
    J&K Tutoring is offline Member
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    Re: don'cha = don't you ? If so, "cha" is the dialect of "you"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Over the top View Post
    Is 'want' is pronounced something like 'watch/?
    No- it would sound more like 'wanch'. "I want you to stand up." would sound like "I wanchoo to stand up."

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