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  1. #1
    Naeem PTC is offline Junior Member
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    Default The hens are picking at the corn/wheat

    Hi teachers,

    1) I am fine. What about you? How about you? Difference between how about and what about?

    2) How about buying this? What about buying this? Difference between how about and what about?

    3) The hens are pecking at the corn. is correct as I read it in a dictionary but "The hens are picking at the corn/wheat." is also correct?

    4) How fast the time is elapsing! OR How fast time is elapsing!

    5) I don't have the time. Or I don't have time.


    Many thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    JohnParis's Avatar
    JohnParis is offline Senior Member
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      • Retired Academic
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    Default Re: The hens are picking at the corn/wheat

    Quote Originally Posted by Naeem PTC View Post
    Hi teachers,

    1) I am fine. What about you? How about you? Difference between how about and what about? In this context there is little difference. Both are used and acceptable.

    2) How about buying this? What about buying this? Difference between how about and what about? Same as above;

    3) The hens are pecking at the corn. is correct as I read it in a dictionary but "The hens are picking at the corn/wheat." is also correct? Hens peck, they do not pick.

    4) How fast the time is elapsing! OR How fast time is elapsing! Both are acceptable but most native speakers would not use the word "elapsing" when referring to the passage of time. It's awkward.

    5) I don't have the time. Or I don't have time. In this context there is little difference. Both are used and acceptable.


    Many thanks in advance.
    J

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