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  1. #1
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default to feel + adjective/adverb

    When speaking about feelings, we always use adjectives, donít we?
    E.g. I feel good. X I feel well. (means that we feel healthy?)

    If we didnít have any hobbies, we would feel bored and unpleasant.
    Is unpleasant right, or do we have to say unpleasantly instead? Why?

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: to feel + adjective/adverb

    Use an adjective- don't forget that 'well' can be an adjective too. If it were an adverb it wouldn't mean his health, but his ability to feel things, with his hands or whatever. In your second example, 'unpleasant' is the correct form, but I'd change the word and use unhappy/depressed, etc.

  3. #3
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: to feel + adjective/adverb

    Thanks.
    I just asked because I had written "unpleasant" (not the adverb form with -ly) in an English test (exam) and my teacher had corrected it to "unpleasantly". It seemed quite weird to me and that's why I asked you. You see, it's better to believe you and learn from you than to believe Czech teachers...

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: to feel + adjective/adverb

    I feel unhappy = I am in a bad mood
    I feel unhappily = I don't enjoy feeling (unlikely sentence)- maybe a customs officer might use it about having to search people

  5. #5
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: to feel + adjective/adverb

    I think I donít understand it.
    I read this sentences: I wonít be coming o work today. Iím not feeling/donít feel very well.
    You told me that if I say I feel well it means that my sense organs are good. But in this sentence, it evidently means that Iím ill or sick, doesnít it?

    Moreover, I didnít really know that WELL is and adjective! I have always thought it was an adverbÖ Or is it both adjective and adverb?

  6. #6
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: to feel + adjective/adverb

    By the way, which one is right?:
    1)I don't think I understand it.
    2)I think I don't understand it.
    I guess the first one is right...then I wrote it incorrectly in my previous reply...

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: to feel + adjective/adverb

    'Well' can be both an adverb (he speaks well) and an adjective (feels well).

    With 'understand', both are possible, but the first sounds more natural for the post.

  8. #8
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: to feel + adjective/adverb

    Well, but in the meaning "to feel well" it (well) can be both adjective and adverb, both with different meanings?

  9. #9
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: to feel + adjective/adverb

    Does it mean that if I say "I feel well" it might mean both I am not sick and have a good mood and that I can feel (for example a thing) without problems?

  10. #10
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: to feel + adjective/adverb

    It could, but the second meaning is very unlikely, unless you have been suffering from a disease that affects your ability to touch and feel but are better now.

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