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Thread: ice vs ices

  1. #1
    keannu's Avatar
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    Default ice vs ices

    I happened to find this material regarding countable & uncountable nouns, and this part deals with uncountable nouns(mass nouns) can be converted to countable nouns when they refers to actual types of things, and one of the examples is "ice vs ices"
    Have you heard of "ices"? If it exists, what does it mean?

    ice vs ices from the material
    ex) One more example: "I love the works of Beethoven" means that I like his symphonies, his string quartets, his concerti and sonatas, his choral pieces all very countable things, works. "I hate work" means that I find the very idea of labor, in a general way, quite unappealing. Notice that the plural form means something quite different from the singular form of this word; they're obviously related, but they're different. What is the relationship between plastic and plastics, wood and woods, ice and [Italian] ices, hair and hairs?
    Further, as noted earlier, almost all mass nouns can become count nouns when they are used in a classificatory sense
    a. They served some nice Brazilian wines.
    b. There were some real beauties in that rose garden.
    c. We had some serious difficulties in this project.

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    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: ice vs ices

    Ice and ices used to mean ice-cream/s.


    ice
    ▶noun
    1 frozen water, a brittle transparent crystalline solid.
    chiefly Brit. an ice cream or water ice.
    (WordReference Dictionary)

    This usage is rarely heard these days.

    Rover

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    Default Re: ice vs ices

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Ice and ices used to mean ice-cream/s.


    (WordReference Dictionary)

    This usage is rarely heard these days.

    Rover
    Thanks a lot! So can I conclude ices used to mean ice-cream, but we don't have to care about it now as it's almost extinct in terms of its usage?

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    Default Re: ice vs ices

    Rover's words seemed pretty clear to me:

    "Ice and ices used to mean ice-cream/s.

    This usage is rarely heard these days."
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


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    Default Re: ice vs ices

    Actually, in this part of Pennsylvania, what Iis called talian water ice (or Polish water ice -- I'm not sure of the difference) is quite popular. (Why, I don't know. Give me a good ice cream over a water ice, any day!)

    So you could easlily hear "We stopped by Rita's and got four ices."
    Last edited by Barb_D; 13-Jan-2012 at 00:26.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    Default Re: ice vs ices

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Actually, in this part of Pennsylvania, what Italian water ice (or Polish water ice -- I'm not sure of the difference) is quite popular. (Why, I don't know. Give me a good ice cream over a water ice, any day!)

    So you could easlily hear "We stopped by Rita's and got four ices."
    You mean, in the states, you use ices for ice-cream or water ice? Can you use it for both or only for ice-cream?
    Sorry! After carefully reading it, only water ice seem to be possible as ices, but is it common? Can I tell my students you can use it?

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    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: ice vs ices

    Not for ice cream. Only for flavored ice, usually known as "Italian ice." (Though I've been to the Jersey shore and they do indeed have "Polish water ice.")

    TLC's Polish Water Ice - TLC Refreshments Inc.

    Italian ice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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