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  1. #1
    Mannkavi's Avatar
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    Thumbs up "for improving" vs "to improve"

    I know, I need to work hard for improving my English.
    I know, I need to work hard to improve my English.
    I guess both sentences are correct.

    My question is, are "for improving" and "to improve" interchangeable? Please help. I'm really confused.
    Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: "for improving" vs "to improve"

    Quote Originally Posted by Mannkavi View Post
    I know, I need to work hard for improving my English. X
    I know, I need to work hard to improve my English.
    I guess both sentences are correct.

    My question is, are "for improving" and "to improve" interchangeable? Please help. I'm really confused.
    Thank you.
    There might be some contexts in which they're interchangeable but not in your example. Your first sentence is not correct.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: "for improving" vs "to improve"

    My question is, are "for improving" and "to improve" interchangeable?

    No, they are not interchangeable as you have used them here.
    "
    I know, I need to work hard to improve my English" is the only option that is correct, and the simple present is the best tense for this type of sentence.

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: "for improving" vs "to improve"

    For improving your English, there's nothing better than practice.

  5. #5
    Mannkavi's Avatar
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    Default Re: "for improving" vs "to improve"

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    There might be some contexts in which they're interchangeable but not in your example. Your first sentence is not correct.
    Thanks emsr2d2.
    Is there any rule for this interchangeability?
    Can you give one or two example where they're interchangeable.

  6. #6
    Mannkavi's Avatar
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    Default Re: "for improving" vs "to improve"

    Quote Originally Posted by Mannkavi View Post
    Thanks emsr2d2.
    Is there any rule for this interchangeability?
    Can you give one or two example where they're interchangeable.
    Sometime it's really become confusing.

    I want to improve my english. I need someone for improving my english.
    I think, now it is easier for you to understand my problem.
    Please help!

  7. #7
    Mannkavi's Avatar
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    Default Re: "for improving" vs "to improve"

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnParis View Post
    My question is, are "for improving" and "to improve" interchangeable?

    No, they are not interchangeable as you have used them here.
    "
    I know, I need to work hard to improve my English" is the only option that is correct, and the simple present is the best tense for this type of sentence.
    Please tell me when we use "for verb+ing" and "to verb" ?

  8. #8
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: "for improving" vs "to improve"

    Typing the same question three times in a row isn't going to make us answer any faster. The opposite, in fact.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: "for improving" vs "to improve"

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    For improving your English, there's nothing better than practice.
    It depends on what you want to emphasize really.

    if you use for+ing you are laying emphasis on the function that an object may have.

    e.g. I need a knife for cutting bread. (it means you need a special knife which serves that purpose or has that function).

    If you use the infinitive (TO+verb) the emphasis is laid on the purpose of an action.

    I need a knife to cut the bread (it is more focussed on the fact that unless you have a knife, you won't be able to cut the bread)

    I hope it helps.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: "for improving" vs "to improve"

    Quote Originally Posted by shannico View Post
    if you use for+ing you are laying emphasis on the function that an object may have.
    If you use the infinitive (TO+verb) the emphasis is laid on the purpose of an action.
    I don't feel that we necessarily make that distinction.
    Last edited by 5jj; 17-Jan-2012 at 18:34.

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