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Thread: up/down

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    #1

    up/down

    When giving directions, how do I decide when to use "up the road/hall/street" or "down the road/hall/street"? I told one of my movers that my bedroom was "down the hall" but then he corrected me and said it was actually "up the hall". I think I was right but I didn't argue with him. Maybe I was wrong, but how do I know?

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    #2

    Re: up/down

    I'd tell the mover that I wasn't paying him to correct my English.

    When you are talking about a level area, up and down are usually interchangeable. Obviously, if I live up on a hill, then "up the road" and "down the road" have a more literal meaning.

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    #3

    Re: up/down

    I'd tell the mover that I wasn't paying him to correct my English.

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    #4

    Re: up/down

    Quote Originally Posted by smk View Post
    When giving directions, how do I decide when to use "up the road/hall/street" or "down the road/hall/street"?

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Here is what Mr. Michael Swan says in his highly reliable Practical English Grammar:

    "Sometimes both up and down are used to mean 'along,' 'further on,' with little or no difference of meaning."

    Mr. Swan's example:

    The nearest post office is about half a mile up/down the road.

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    #5

    Re: up/down

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Here is what Mr. Michael Swan says in his highly reliable Practical English Grammar:

    "Sometimes both up and down are used to mean 'along,' 'further on,' with little or no difference of meaning."

    Mr. Swan's example:

    The nearest post office is about half a mile up/down the road.
    Thank you, this was very helpful!

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    #6

    Re: up/down

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    I'd tell the mover that I wasn't paying him to correct my English.

    When you are talking about a level area, up and down are usually interchangeable. Obviously, if I live up on a hill, then "up the road" and "down the road" have a more literal meaning.

    Thank you!!!

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