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  1. #1
    RALAIARINORO is offline Newbie
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    Default difference between american and english

    it was a long time that I studied english. But there are many things that I can't manage when I use "get" in all its meaning. Why american get used to use it rather than british tends to use "have". Is there a different meaning?

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: difference between american and english

    Welcome to the forum, RALAIARINORO.

    The title of your thread would have been better as Difference between American and British English. American English is one variety of English; British English is another.

    it was a long time that I studied e English.
    Do you mean "It was a long time ago that I studied English" or "I have been studying English for a long time"?
    But there are many things that I can't manage, for example, when I should use "get" in all its meanings. Why do a Americans get used to use it rather than b British tends to use "have". Is there a different meaning?
    Speakers of both varieties of English frequently use 'get' in place of more specific verbs, sometimes in in similar way, sometimes not. If you have learnt Britsh English, then American usage will sometimes seem strange to you. British usage can seem strange to those who have learnt American English
    Last edited by 5jj; 26-Jan-2012 at 12:26. Reason: typo

  3. #3
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: difference between american and english

    And if you put 5jj's amended title into the Search box at the top of the page you'll find links to many interesting discussions on this topic.

    Rover

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    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: difference between american and english

    Quote Originally Posted by RALAIARINORO View Post
    Why american get used to use it rather than british tends to use "have". Is there a different meaning?
    Can you give an example of this?

    Welcome to the forum.

  5. #5
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: difference between american and english

    I wonder if you mean "got" and not "get."

    My American view:
    Have you got a pen? -- More likely to be used when you want to borrow it.
    Do you have a pen? -- More likely to be used when a pen is needed. You'll have to fill out this form in blue or black in. Do you have a pen? No? You can borrow mine. However, I may be just as likely to use this when I want to borrow your pen too. Do you have a pen I could use for a moment?

    I've got a pen. I have a pen. -- Either one could be used, but you're more likely to echo the tense used by the person who asked.

    While "got" is the past of get, it means "to obtain" not "to have."
    "Got" is its own word as well.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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