View Poll Results: You ____ do it.

Voters
2354. This poll is closed
  • hadn't better

    395 16.78%
  • had better not

    1,782 75.70%
  • Either

    177 7.52%
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Thread: Had better

  1. #61
    Teia is offline Key Member
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    Re: Had better

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Yes, it is used; it can convey more force than 'shouldn't'.
    Hi Richard


    I think I understand the real meaning of had better vs. should not now that I have done some research on it. Had better has a more compulsory or coercive characteristic.

    Thank you very much.

  2. #62
    allawy70 is offline Newbie
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    Re: Had better

    Do we have to use "better had"? and what difference will it make if we don't

  3. #63
    aggelos is offline Junior Member
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    Re: Had better

    Had better + bare infinitive means you should do something because, if you don't, the consequences will probably be rather bad for you (as in the case of your girlfriend possibly leaving you). The expression (often contracted to 'd better) is grammatically incorrect without had (or 'd), although many people think that you better, for example, is correct; they just miss the (hardly audible) 'd.

    And I think Isra meant I had better leave, not live, right?

  4. #64
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Re: Had better

    Quote Originally Posted by aggelos View Post
    And I think Isra meant I had better leave, not live, right?
    Offhand, I'd say yes. Emphatically so.


  5. #65
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    Re: Had better

    Useful when it comes to giving advice -you are not comparing something to something else, so forget about the 'better'. Always the same form and followed by bare infinitive. In spite of 'had' you are not talking about the past or referring to a past situation, the meaning is present (or near future).I'd better put an end to this. (by the way, do not let 'd rather' lead you astray, this is preference).

  6. #66
    zeus is offline Newbie
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    Re: Had better

    Hi Friends,
    In meaning, had better is close to ''should/ ought to'' but ''had better'' is usually stronger.Often had better implies a warning or a threat of possible bad consequences.
    You had better not do it = If you do it, there will be a bad result.

  7. #67
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    Re: Had better

    "had better" is a modal idiom that means "should."

  8. #68
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    Re: Had better

    "had better" is a modal idiom. Since it's modal, it does not take "to" before a following infinitive.
    "You'd better BE quiet." is good English.
    "You'd better TO BE quiet" is not English.

    BTW: "had better" means "should."

  9. #69
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    Re: Had better

    Quote Originally Posted by gabber View Post
    "had better" is a modal idiom. Since it's modal, it does not take "to" before a following infinitive.
    "You'd better BE quiet." is good English.
    "You'd better TO BE quiet" is not English.

    BTW: "had better" means "should."
    "You'd better TO BE quiet" is still English, just wrong grammar.

  10. #70
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    Re: Had better

    i think,HAD BETTER is used for those actions, which are good to take in any particullar situations
    eg:
    we had better read these structions before we start cooking.
    it means.
    it would be good, if we read the structions first.

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