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  1. #1
    maoyueh is offline Member
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    Default caught him by the arm=caught his arm?

    Among the following pairs of sentences, can I change A's to B's? Thank you a lot.

    1. A. He patted his son on the head.
    B. He patted his son's head.
    2. A. He caught him by the arm.
    B. He caught his arm.
    3. A. He grabbed the snake by the neck.
    B. He grabbed the snake's neck.
    4. A. She kissed me on the cheeks.
    B. She kissed my cheeks.
    5. A. She struck him across the face.
    B. She struck his face.
    6. A. I pulled her by the sleeve.
    B. I pulled her sleeve.

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: caught him by the arm=caught his arm?

    Yes, though in number 4, you turn a normal sentence into one that sounds a bit weird to me. And in some, the meaning of focus changes- 6, for instance- pulling someone's sleeve is not the same as pulling someone by the sleeve, which would be used as a way of controlling their movements or stopping them.

    Do snakes have necks? 3 sounds a bit odd to me too.

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: caught him by the arm=caught his arm?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    ....
    Do snakes have necks? 3 sounds a bit odd to me too.
    I'm not an expert, but I thInk the place to grab a snake is 'behind the head'. But, if you like, you could use them same example with any creature that had a neck. Would 'duck-billed platypus' work for you?

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 03-Feb-2012 at 14:38. Reason: Fix _3_ typos; my fingers are cold!

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: caught him by the arm=caught his arm?

    Yes, but again the meaning is slightly different to me.

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