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  1. #1
    KelvinLi is offline Newbie
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    Default To yield without conviction - Pride and Prejudice

    Hi,

    I have been reading the book "Pride and Prejudice" and found the following extract from a dialogue between Mr. Darcy (?) and Miss Elizabeth Bennet (?), in chapter 10, very difficult to understand.

    "...Miss Bennet, that the friend who is supposed to desire his return to the house, and the delay of his plan, has merely desired it, asked it without offering one argument in favour of its propriety"
    "To yield readily -- easily -- to the PERSUASION of a friend is no merit with you"
    "To yield without conviction is no compliment to the understanding of either"

    Could somebody please explain to me that what they are saying and in particular, how to understand the meaning of the phrases highlighted ?


    Thanks very much,

    Li

  2. #2
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: To yield without conviction - Pride and Prejudice

    to yield = admit defeat in an argument (in this context)
    conviction = being convinced (in this context)

    Other words you may find difficult:

    propriety = properness/adherence to society's view of the right way to behave
    is no merit - today we would say 'hasno merit/value...'
    understanding = rational way of thinking

    Darcy disapproves of Elizabeth's readiness to pay heed to a friend's desires. Darcy had done what he 'should' do (his duty not to submit to Bingley's wishes- at least, I think that's the context - it's far too long since I re-read the book.)

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 06-Feb-2012 at 11:40.

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    KelvinLi is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: To yield without conviction - Pride and Prejudice

    Hi Bob,

    Thanks very much for the quick reply.

    So, would it be correct if I "interpret" their conversation as the following ?

    First, Darcy disapproves his friend, Bingley, of his doing things irrationally, (i.e. without offering one argument in favour of its propriety). Then, Elizabeth criticises Darcy that he has a desire (instead of for the good of his friend's) to change the mind of his friend, which would be selfish, if not immoral. Darcy replied to it by saying that being unconvicingly agreeing with others wouldn't be rational either.


    Cheers,

    Li

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    to yield = admit defeat in an argument (in this context)
    conviction = being convinced (in this context)

    Other words you may find difficult:

    propriety = properness/adherence to society's view of the right way to behave
    is no merit - today we would say 'hasno merit/value...'
    understanding = rational way of thinking

    Darcy disapproves of Elizabeth's readiness to pay heed to a friend's desires. Darcy had done what he 'should' do (his duty not to submit to Bingley's wishes- at least, I think that's the context - it's far too long since I re-read the book.)

    b

  4. #4
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: To yield without conviction - Pride and Prejudice

    You've got the right general idea, but 'unconvicingly agreeing' is wrong - say 'agreeing [to something] wihout being convinced'.

    b

  5. #5
    KelvinLi is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: To yield without conviction - Pride and Prejudice

    Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    You've got the right general idea, but 'unconvicingly agreeing' is wrong - say 'agreeing [to something] wihout being convinced'.

    b

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