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  1. #1
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    traditional dessert drinks

    "Traditional dessert drinks"

    How can I understand that noun phrase and analyze it? Meaning is the same?


    1) traditional + dessert drinks

    2) traditional dessert + drinks



    "A funny moive festival"
    Is it important to analyze those noun phrases differently, considering context?

    1) funny + moive festival

    2) funny moive + festival


    Please help me...

  2. #2
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    Re: traditional dessert drinks

    Quote Originally Posted by Kwang hee Han View Post
    "Traditional dessert drinks"

    How can I understand that noun phrase and analyze it? Is the meaning
    is the same?


    1) traditional + dessert drinks

    2) traditional dessert + drinks



    "A funny moive festival"
    Is it important to analyze those noun phrases differently, considering context?

    1) funny + moive festival

    2) funny moive + festival


    Please help me.


    What is a "moive"?
    And before 5jj says it - context is always important!


  3. #3
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    Re: traditional dessert drinks

    Quote Originally Posted by Kwang hee Han View Post
    Please help me...
    In this case, the meaning is very probably:
    traditional [dessert drinks] - dessert drinks that are traditional, and
    [funny movie] festival - a festival of funny movies.
    ems is right. There's no way of telling without the context. In some cases, you might have to "guess".

  4. #4
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    Re: traditional dessert drinks

    Maybe you do have to guess at times, but I find both of these cases clear. There are no drinks widely known to accompany traditional desserts: "I'll have a banana split with the usual glass of water?"
    "An apple pie, with the traditional glass of root beer." No, that interpretation is right out.

    But there are drinks which are traditionally served as digestifs, such as port and sherry. These are your 'traditional dessert drinks."

    With the funny movie festival, I don't think it's possible for a festival itself to be billed as funny if it's a festival of horror or tragedy films. What's funny about a festival, as the sum of parts, when the parts aren't funny?

    I think it's pretty clear we're dealing with a phase meant to denote a festival of comedies.

  5. #5
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    Re: traditional dessert drinks

    Sorry. it was a movie, not a moive.

    What I meant is that when "traditional" modifys "dessert drinks" and
    "traditional dessert" modifys drinks, is there a meaning difference between them?


  6. #6
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    Re: traditional dessert drinks

    Yes, there can be a difference. But English has an order of adjectives that makes such ambiguities rare.

  7. #7
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    Re: traditional dessert drinks

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Maybe you do have to guess at times, but I find both of these cases clear.
    By "guess", I mean "use all the contextual information available to work out the most probable meaning." In this case, we agree on the most probable meanings. The need to "guess" is more applicable to those who don't know English as well as you or I do.

  8. #8
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    Thanks a million to all

    You guys are so great and helpful. Thanks again.

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