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  1. #1
    Joern Matthias is offline Junior Member
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    Smile in time and on time

    Could I say:

    1) I want to be at work on time. (meaning: punctually, at the planned time, neither late nor
    early)
    2) I want to be at work in time. (meaning: with enough time to spare before my work starts as
    planned or arranged)

    3) I want to be at work in time because I intend to have a cup of coffee there before my shift
    starts.

    Greetings from Bavaria,

    Joern

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: in time and on time

    Quote Originally Posted by Joern Matthias View Post
    1) I want to be at work on time. (meaning: punctually, at the planned time, neither late nor early)
    2) I want to be at work in time. (meaning: with enough time to spare before my work starts as planned or arranged) This does not sound natural to me.

    3) I want to be at work in time because I intend to have a cup of coffee there before my shift starts.
    No. We'd probably use 'early' instead of 'in time', or: "I want to be at work in time to have a cup of coffee there before my shift starts."
    5

  3. #3
    Joern Matthias is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: in time and on time

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    5
    Thank you very much for your answer. What is the difference between "in time" and "early". In what context and sense can I use
    the expression "in time"? Why can I not use "in time" in my sentence number 3 but in the one in blue you rephrased right below?

    What about these sentences?

    1) Because I prepared for my A-level test early/in time, I passed it.

    2) As my severely injured friend arrived in hospial in time/early, he survived.


    Which expression or word can I use here and why?

    I am looking forward to your answer.

    Greetings from Bavaria
    Last edited by Joern Matthias; 23-Apr-2012 at 09:44.

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