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    #1

    Invite x Invitation

    Hi People!

    Please, I want to know about difference between invite and invitation.

    Invite is a verb
    Invitation is a noum

    Correctly?

    Why can't I use "Thank you for invite me"?

    Invite in this case is a verb?

    Thank you

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    #2

    Re: Invite x Invitation

    Quote Originally Posted by matheus.canela View Post
    Why can't I use "Thank you for invite me"?

    "Invite" in this case is a verb?
    After the preposition 'for', we need the -ing form 'inviting'.

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    #3

    Re: Invite x Invitation

    But in this case, my teacher changed for "invitation", not "inviting" :(

    I rewrite my PET Exam Teste, can you help me with my doubts?

    PET Writing

    How are you? Thank you for invitation ( [a] invite) me, but my wife will go to her father’s house, and I need to go with her ( [b] I need follow her), I’m sorry! What do you think about meetings ( [c] think to meet us on) next Sunday at ( [d] on) my house?

    Matheus Canela

    Questions
    a) INVITE is a verb, why can’t I use in this phrase “Thank you for invite me”?
    b) “I need to go with her” and “I need follow her” is the same?
    c) What is incorrect in this phrase “What do you think t meet us on...”

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    #4

    Re: Invite x Invitation

    Quote Originally Posted by matheus.canela View Post

    How are you? Thank you for invitation ( [a] invite) me, (This is not correct. We can write, "Thank you for the invitation" or "Thank you for inviting me".) but my wife will go ('is going' is far more natural)to her fatherís house, and I need to go with her ( [b] I need follow her)(It would have to be 'I need to follow her', but it is unlikely that this is what you want to say.), Iím sorry! What do you think about meetings ( [c] think to meet us on) next Sunday at ( [d] on) my house?
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    #5

    Re: Invite x Invitation

    Thanks man!

    One more question.

    Example if I want to say:

    "Thanks you for go with me" - The same at "Thanks you for invite me"

    Do I need put -ING if I use "FOR"?

    "Thanks you for going with me"

    Its a rule?
    Last edited by matheus.canela; 09-Feb-2012 at 11:10.

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    #6

    Re: Invite x Invitation

    Quote Originally Posted by matheus.canela View Post
    "Thanks you for go with me" - The same ats "Thanks you for invite me"

    Do I need put -ING if I use "FOR"? "Thanks you for going with me". Yes
    5

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    #7

    Re: Invite x Invitation

    Invite is also a noun. It is mostly used informally as indicated by the link below

    noun
    7.
    Informal . an invitation.


    Invite | Define Invite at Dictionary.com

    So I wouldn't really mark it as a mistake if you used one word instead of the other. I've heard plenty of people say "Thanks for your invite" in the right context.

    More importantly, I'd focus on using a possessive adjective or a definite article before invite/invitation, which is necessary in the example provided, e.g.

    Thanks for your /the invite/invitation.

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    #8

    Re: Invite x Invitation

    Quote Originally Posted by shannico View Post
    Invite is also a noun. It is mostly used informally as indicated by the link below

    noun
    7.
    Informal . an invitation.

    Invite | Define Invite at Dictionary.com

    So I wouldn't really mark it as a mistake if you used one word instead of the other. I've heard plenty of people say "Thanks for your invite" in the right context.

    More importantly, I'd focus on using a possessive adjective or a definite article before invite/invitation, which is necessary in the example provided, e.g.

    Thanks for your /the invite/invitation.
    I'd have no trouble in marking this wrong in an exam where the correct form was expected.
    I've heard plenty of people say "gonna" and "ain't". In an English exam, they're incorrect. I've also heard plenty of things that are demonstrably ungrammatical.
    Many people can not or do not speak correct English.

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    #9

    Re: Invite x Invitation

    Didn't I say its usage would depend on the context?

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    #10

    Re: Invite x Invitation

    Quote Originally Posted by shannico View Post
    Didn't I say its usage would depend on the context?
    And didn't Raymott give a context?

    "I'd have no trouble in marking this wrong in an exam where the correct form was expected."

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