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  1. #1
    Tedwonny is offline Member
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    Question They can also withdraw (at) anytime?

    Hello all,

    I wrote they can also withdraw anytime [from the study].

    I was told that 'at' is necessary before anytime. Is this true? A must?

    I thought anytime is an adverb.

    thanks

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: They can also withdraw (at) anytime?

    'At' is not essential. 'Any time' - two words.
    Last edited by 5jj; 10-Feb-2012 at 21:54.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  3. #3
    TheParser is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: They can also withdraw (at) anytime?

    [QUOTE=Tedwonny;854742]


    CAUTION: NOT A TEACHER


    (1) I have checked my books, dictionaries, and the Web. I believe that the following is

    accurate.

    (a) They can withdraw at any time from the study. (Prepositional phrase being used as an adverb to modify the verb "can withdraw.")

    (b) They can withdraw any time from the study. (a so-called adverbial objective. That is, a noun phrase being used as an adverb to modify the verb.)

    (c) They can withdraw anytime from the study. (An adverb that is considered good, informal American usage.)

    NOTES:

    (1) Maybe "anytime" is also used by Americans in formal writing. I do not know.

    (2) Some people think that there is a difference in meaning between (a) and (b). I am

    not qualified to comment on that topic.

  4. #4
    Tedwonny is offline Member
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    Wink Re: They can also withdraw (at) anytime?

    Thank you very much

    As an advanced ESL learner, I do have to voice my discontent how some native English speakers just love to 'over-correct' things we've written as if they were the only model but in fact there are so many grey areas in English and nothing is quite unanimous. It's not like we have L'Académie française or what. It's really discouraging to us aiming to fine-tune our English and take it to the next level.
    haha, just letting off steam and explaining why I asked this in the first place


    My tutor told me that 'at' was absolutely necessary. Anyway, I won't argue with him but after hearing from you guys, I don't quite think I'm in the wrong this time... fortunately

  5. #5
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    Default Re: They can also withdraw (at) anytime?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tedwonny View Post
    As an advanced ESL learner, I do have to voice my discontent how some native English speakers just love to 'over-correct' things we've written as if they were the only model but in fact there are so many grey areas in English and nothing is quite unanimous.
    In this forum, most people post material in the hope that corrections will be made. As we are aware that many people may be taking examinations such as FCE, IELTS, TOEFL, we tend, unless asked not to, to err on the slightly formal side.

    However, the good thing about anybody being able to post is that our advice is not given as something that must always be followed. Members are free to ask people who have responded why certain things have been corrected, and others can come in to rectify wrong or misleading answers. If a response is not challenged, and if it has been 'liked' by two or three people you know to give accurate answers generally, then you can be pretty sure that the advice/information given in the post is sound.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


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