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  1. #1
    Ju is offline Senior Member
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    last night, yesterday night

    1. What time did you go to bed last night?

    2. What time did you go to bed yesterday night?

    What are the differences between the above sentences?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
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    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Re: last night, yesterday night

    The second one is not incorrect, butt is just far less commonly used than 'last night'. I suggest that students use only 'last night'.

  3. #3
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    Re: last night, yesterday night

    Both "yesterday night" and "yesternight" are theoretically fine but will get strange reactions. Stick to "last night" as native speakers do.

  4. #4
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: last night, yesterday night

    Stick to "last night" as native speakers do.
    I agree, though 'yesterday evening' and 'last evening' are occasionally used to refer to a more specific time of day.

  5. #5
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    Re: last night, yesterday night

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Both "yesterday night" and "yesternight" are theoretically fine but will get strange reactions. Stick to "last night" as native speakers do.
    I agree about 'yesternight', though I would go further and say that it is incorrect in modern English. 'Yesterday night' is uncommon, but not strange, in my opinion.

  6. #6
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    Re: last night, yesterday night

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I agree about 'yesternight', though I would go further and say that it is incorrect in modern English. 'Yesterday night' is uncommon, but not strange, in my opinion.
    Fair point, though it doesn't make much sense. "Yesternight" at least matches the construction of "yesterday" but "yesterday night" always sounds oddly wordy to me. But yes, "yesternight" doesn't fit modern English usage at all.

  7. #7
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Re: last night, yesterday night

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Both "yesterday night" and "yesternight" are theoretically fine but will get strange reactions. Stick to "last night" as native speakers do.
    Even 'yestreen' [archaic]

    b

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