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  1. aachu's Avatar
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    #1

    You're sure to..

    "...But if you always use 'ain't' instead of the more “proper” contractions you’re sure to be branded as uneducated"

    My questions:
    1- What does you're sure to mean?
    2- Is it one of the examples of sentences that carry futurity in the present tense?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: You're sure to..

    Quote Originally Posted by aachu View Post
    "...But, if you always use 'ain't' instead of the more “proper” contractions, you’re sure to be branded as uneducated"

    My questions:
    1- What does you're sure to mean?
    2- Is it one of the examples of sentences that carry futurity in the present tense?
    It's a conditional sentence "if you do that, this will happen".

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: You're sure to..

    You are sure to ... = It is certain that you will ...

    It is the infinitive, rather than the present tense that refers to future happening, as it so often does -

    I hope/want/expect/am eager/etc to see you next week.

    Like the 'being sure', the 'hoping, wanting expecting, being eager' denote present feelings about a future 'seeing'.

    Note that in I will see you and I am going to see you, the underlined forms are present tense forms. As we have no future tense as such in English, futurity can only be expressed with present tense (and occasionally past tense) forms.

  4. aachu's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: You're sure to..

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    You are sure to ... = It is certain that you will ...

    It is the infinitive, rather than the present tense that refers to future happening, as it so often does -

    I hope/want/expect/am eager/etc to see you next week.

    Like the 'being sure', the 'hoping, wanting expecting, being eager' denote present feelings about a future 'seeing'.
    Thank you 5jj . Just as you explained the rule, I remembered a similar sentences I had long ago read in a novel. It was something like: "If you become too focused on what might happen, you are apt to make mistakes". I got what it meant but didn't know the rule then. I've got it now. These kind of sentences won't confuse me from now on.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: You're sure to..

    Quote Originally Posted by aachu View Post
    "If you become too focused on what might happen, you are apt to make mistakes". I got what it meant but didn't know the rule then. I've got it now. These kind of sentences won't confuse me from now on.
    If you are apt to do something, you have a tendency to do it; the time is more likely to be the general present than the future. It is important to bear in mind the meaning of the words and the context before assuming that there are firm rules.

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