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  1. #1
    patran is offline Member
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    Default Good Morning vs Good Morning

    Hi teachers and gurus

    I heard some natives pronuncing "Good Morning" in two different ways

    1) Good Morning [stress MOR]
    2) Good Morning [stress GOOD and MING]

    Why is there such a difference in stress placement. Any different meanings between 1) and 2)?

    Please advise

    Anthony the learner
    Last edited by patran; 16-Feb-2012 at 07:43. Reason: typo correction

  2. #2
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Good Morning vs Good Morning

    Quote Originally Posted by patran View Post
    Hi teachers and gurus

    I heard some natives pronuncing "Good Morning" in two different ways

    1) Good Morning [stress MOR]
    2) Good Morning [stress GOOD and MING]

    Why is there such a difference in stress placement. Any different meanings between 1) and 2)?

    Please advise

    Anthony the learner
    "Good morning." would be extremely rare. No one says 'morning'
    "Good Morning" and "Good morning" are normal, and you might hear, "Good mor.ning"

    There are differences in stress because people are in different moods in the morning; it's a greeting, and there will be intonations that are personalised, sometimes singsong or expressive in other ways. (But I've never heard 'morning'.)

  3. #3
    yangmuye is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Good Morning vs Good Morning

    Hi, which of the following three ways is more common? The pitches of the stressed syllables are different.
    Thanks.

    ˈgʊ́d.ˈmɔ́˞.nɪŋ
    ˌgʊ̀d.ˈmɔ́˞.nɪŋ
    ˈgʊ́d.ˈmɔ̀˞.nɪŋ

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: Good Morning vs Good Morning

    Quote Originally Posted by yangmuye View Post
    Hi, which of the following three ways is more common? The pitches of the stressed syllables are different.
    Thanks.

    ˈgʊ́d.ˈmɔ́˞.nɪŋ
    ˌgʊ̀d.ˈmɔ́˞.nɪŋ
    ˈgʊ́d.ˈmɔ̀˞.nɪŋ
    I don't know the system you're using - eg. the difference between /ʊ́/ and /ʊ̀/. Also if the ɔ́˞ is a rhotic 'or', none of these would be common in non-rhotic places.
    My advice would be to search for sound files. There's no mandated way of saying 'Good morning'.

  5. #5
    yangmuye is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Good Morning vs Good Morning

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I don't know the system you're using - eg. the difference between /ʊ́/ and /ʊ̀/. Also if the ɔ́˞ is a rhotic 'or', none of these would be common in non-rhotic places.
    My advice would be to search for sound files. There's no mandated way of saying 'Good morning'.
    I mean, do you pronounce “Good morning” with “mor” a littler higher than “ning” in pitch or lower?
    I think the former one is the typical way.

    If the “MOR” is lower than “Good” and “ning” (but still being stressed), it's probable that a Chinese speaker might perceive the stress incorrectly.

  6. #6
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: Good Morning vs Good Morning

    Quote Originally Posted by yangmuye View Post
    I mean, do you pronounce “Good morning” with “mor” a littler higher than “ning” in pitch or lower?
    No, not necessarily. As I say, there are numerous intonations you can use. I doubt there is one typical way. One common way is to say 'Good' (high tone) 'Morning' (both syllables lower, each at same tone).

    I think the former one is the typical way.

    If the “MOR” is lower than “Good” and “ning” (but still being stressed), it's probable that a Chinese speaker might perceive the stress incorrectly.
    That's possible.

  7. #7
    patran is offline Member
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    Default Re: Good Morning vs Good Morning

    Hi Raymott

    In the following video, the First Certificate in English speaking examiner, when he starts with "Good morning", GOOD is short and higher pitch, while MING is longer and higher pitch. MOR is lower, so it sounds "GOOD morNING". That's the case I am referring, how is it different from "good MOR ning"

    FCE Part 1 - YouTube

    Please advise
    Anthony

  8. #8
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: Good Morning vs Good Morning

    Quote Originally Posted by patran View Post
    Hi Raymott

    In the following video, the First Certificate in English speaking examiner, when he starts with "Good morning", GOOD is short and higher pitch, while MING is longer and higher pitch. MOR is lower, so it sounds "GOOD morNING".
    That's true if Capital letters represent higher pitch/tone.


    That's the case I am referring, how is it different from "good MOR ning"

    FCE Part 1 - YouTube

    Please advise
    Anthony
    Yes, I can see what you mean. But tone is not stress. The stress is where the accent is.
    'Ning" is defintely higher in tone, but that's nothing to do with stress. I would say that he stresses all three syllables which, as I said, is one possible way of saying it.

    The girl replies "morning" The stress is on "morn", but the tone of "ing" is the same. The other guy just mumbles.

  9. #9
    yangmuye is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Good Morning vs Good Morning

    Quote Originally Posted by patran View Post
    Hi Raymott

    In the following video, the First Certificate in English speaking examiner, when he starts with "Good morning", GOOD is short and higher pitch, while MING is longer and higher pitch. MOR is lower, so it sounds "GOOD morNING". That's the case I am referring, how is it different from "good MOR ning"

    Please advise
    Anthony
    I think a syllable is (lexically) stressed if
    * it contains a non-reduced vowel
    * the vowel is enunciated longer( and usually louder)

    The pitch is not the most important distinction.
    The vowel “i” in “ning” is not longer than the “o”. It's “ningnnn” rather than “niiing”.
    Last edited by yangmuye; 16-Feb-2012 at 15:20.

  10. #10
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: Good Morning vs Good Morning

    Quote Originally Posted by yangmuye View Post
    I think a syllable is (lexically) stressed if
    * it contains a non-reduced vowel
    * the vowel is enunciated longer( and usually louder)
    Where did you get this idea?

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