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Thread: echo & resonate

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    #1

    echo & resonate

    If there is this condition:
    You hear President Obama's speech, after he finished, usually people still hear the same speech inside their head for several hours repetitively.

    Or

    You hear the Beatles, then for the whole day you repetitively hear their specific song that you exactly heard earlier that day.


    Questions:
    1. If I say "President Obama's speech has been resonating inside my head for the whole day", Do I use the word "resonate" properly?

    2. Can I say "echo" instead of "resonate" and produce the same meanings? e.g. "President Obama's speech has been echoing inside my head for the whole day.

    3. Or do you find better substitutes for these words that could best explain the two conditions above?

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    #2

    Re: echo & resonate

    I would express the idea differently and say I can't get the song our of my head or The song's been going round in my head.

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    #3

    Re: echo & resonate

    When you say a speech resonates it's referring to ideas rather than sounds (although in origin 'resonate' obviously refers to sound - as, less obviously, 'person' does [which shows how origins don't always point the right way]).

    b

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    #4

    Re: echo & resonate

    [not a teacher]

    As BobK has pointed out, resonates in this context refers to ideas and not sounds. In this context, echo, IMO, would mean that you're replaying the ideas/speech over and over looking for the ideas that may resonate/may be resonating with you.

    A song, however, would neither resonate nor echo, if your intent is not the ideas of the song, but rather the melody and lyrics.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: echo & resonate

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    I would express the idea differently and say I can't get the song our of my head or The song's been going round in my head.
    Another way of saying it: 'I've got that song on the brain' [note, it's an idiom: 'on THE brain', although from context it's obviously MINE.]

    b

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    #6

    Re: echo & resonate

    See also earworm.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: echo & resonate

    This word was new to me today, in something my son wrote. And now... spooky or what? (Well, the short answer is "Not spooky at all" )

    b

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