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  1. #1
    keannu's Avatar
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    Default I am no more a child than you are (a child)

    How can I understand this sentence? Is it like "The fact that I am no more a child is like the fact you are no more a child"? Why isn't there "no more" between "are" and "a child"?

    ex)I am no more a child than you are (a child)

  2. #2
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    Default Re: I am no more a child than you are (a child)

    * Not a teacher

    I think that it could be interpreted as:

    I am less childish than you are.
    or
    Maybe I am childish, but you are more childish than me.

    It is not a very common construction, only a few hits for "no more a/an *" on both COCA and BNC.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: I am no more a child than you are (a child)

    It means "we are equally childlike".

  4. #4
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    Default Re: I am no more a child than you are (a child)

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    It means "we are equally childlike".
    I would have though it meant "we are equally un-childlike".
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  5. #5
    Rover_KE is online now Moderator
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    Default Re: I am no more a child than you are (a child)

    To me it means 'Neither of us are children'.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: I am no more a child than you are (a child)

    I prefer Rover's version to mine.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: I am no more a child than you are (a child)

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I would have though it meant "we are equally un-childlike".
    Yes, you are right.

  8. #8
    philo2009 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: I am no more a child than you are (a child)

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    How can I understand this sentence? Is it like "The fact that I am no more a child is like the fact you are no more a child"? Why isn't there "no more" between "are" and "a child"?

    ex)I am no more a child than you are (a child)
    It means 'to no greater degree or extent'.

  9. #9
    keannu's Avatar
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    Default Re: I am no more a child than you are (a child)

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    It means 'to no greater degree or extent'.
    Thank you all for the answers, but my intention was to analyze the word composition, and as I judge, it would be like this.
    "I am no more a child than you are (not) a child' = my not being a child is no different from your not being a child.=> but it seems a varied way from the latter to the former.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: I am no more a child than you are (a child)

    You seem to have the right idea - although the way you express it is challenging

    'You are not a child. The extent to which you are a child [i.e. not] is the same for you and me.' I could say to 5jj either 'You are no more a child than I am' or 'I am no more a child than you are'.- Our lack of infancy is equivalent.

    As that COCA report showed, it's not a common format. I imagine it was popular - if only in Br English - when all the major schools offered Latin and Greek. (I can't put my finger on the precise structure*, but it seems to reflect a rather classical way of thinking.)

    b
    PS Perhaps talis...qualis... or tot...quot... maybe - but don't quote me!

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