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  1. #1
    shahin_67 is offline Newbie
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    Default off ( or out of) vs. from vs. in

    Hi,

    While I was just taking an utter glance over Metallica's Turn the Page lyric I stumbled upon the phrase shaking off the cold probably to the effect of shivering in cold. A question instantly popped out off the top of my head that what exactly would be the difference between off (out of), in and from, in the sense of because of. For instance, which one of the following samples are correct and why? (preferably on a grammatical basis)


    • She started shivering in fear after she heard the breaking news.

    or

    • She started shivering off (or out of) fear after she heard the breaking news.

    or

    • She started shivering from fear after she heard


    Thanks ahead,

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: off ( or out of) vs. from vs. in

    'Shaking off' is nothing to do with shivering - or indeed shaking. And the idiom 'shaking off a cold' has nothing to do with THE cold; in fact, someone suffering from a cold may have a raised body temperature. (Shake off - English Phrasal Verb - UsingEnglish.com)

    b

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: off ( or out of) vs. from vs. in

    Quote Originally Posted by shahin_67 View Post
    Hi,

    While I was just taking an utter (this word doesn't make sense here) glance over Metallica's Turn the Page lyric I stumbled upon the phrase shaking off the cold, probably to the effect of meaning shivering in the cold. A question instantly popped out off of the top of my head that - what exactly would be the difference between off (out of), in and from, in the sense of because of? For instance, which one of the following samples examples are correct and why (preferably on a grammatical basis)?


    • She started shivering in fear after she heard the breaking news.

    or

    • She started shivering off (or out of) fear after she heard the breaking news.
    • "Out of" is fine. "Off" does not work at all.

    or

    • She started shivering from fear after she heard the news.


    Thanks ahead in advance.
    We use "shivering with fear", shivering in fear", "shivering out of fear" and "shivering from fear". We never say "shivering off fear".

    There are different meanings for "shaking off" depending on context but it mainly means "to [try to] get rid of".

    I was covered in snow and I was shaking it off my coat.
    I have had a bad cold but I'm gradually shaking it off.

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