Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    CarloSsS's Avatar
    CarloSsS is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Czech
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    629
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default never get to date again vs. never date again

    Hello could you please help me understand the difference?
    I heard two lovers arguing over what the girl had actually said. Her boyfriend claimed that she said, "I will never GET to date again." while she insisted that what she had said was, "I will never date again". What I don't get, is why it was such a big deal whether she said the sentence with "get" or without it. To me, both the statements mean the same, but apparently they are different. So what's the difference?
    Last edited by CarloSsS; 23-Feb-2012 at 00:26.

  2. #2
    J&K Tutoring is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    358
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: never get to date again vs. never date again

    I understand your confusion. The bottom line in both statements is that she will not date. The difference is in how she feels about it. "I will never GET to date again." implies that she wants to, but can't. "I will never date again" sounds as if she does not want to.

  3. #3
    CarloSsS's Avatar
    CarloSsS is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Czech
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    629
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: never get to date again vs. never date again

    Thank you.
    Would the same logic apply to these two statements?
    I finally got to see my son yesterday. (= I had really wanted to see him.)
    I finally saw my son yesterday. (= I didn't care for it much.)

  4. #4
    philo2009 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,507
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: never get to date again vs. never date again

    'Get to do', primarily in AmE, means 'have the opportunity to do'.

  5. #5
    CarloSsS's Avatar
    CarloSsS is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Czech
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    629
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: never get to date again vs. never date again

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    'Get to do', primarily in AmE, means 'have the opportunity to do'.
    Is this supposed to answer my question from my second post in this topic? If so, then I don't get it. If not, please tell me somebody if I go it right based on J&K Tutoring's explanation.

  6. #6
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,167
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: never get to date again vs. never date again

    Quote Originally Posted by CarloSsS View Post
    I finally got to see my son yesterday. (= I had really wanted to see him.) Yes.
    I finally saw my son yesterday. (= I didn't care for it much.) Not necessarily.
    The absence of 'get to' is not necessarily negative. It depends on the situation. The combination of will and never with the absence of get to (have the opportunity to) can imply things that a simple past doesn't.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] on that date
    By Will17 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-Sep-2011, 12:19
  2. [Vocabulary] shipment date vs. delivery date
    By Jack8rkin in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-Sep-2010, 13:09
  3. as per the date
    By Hanka in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 18-Mar-2010, 19:01
  4. [General] same date/even date/instant/ultimo/proximo
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-May-2009, 20:09
  5. Stating date - Today, the <date>
    By Unregistered2005 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 30-Aug-2005, 18:28

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •