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  1. #1
    arnasarutis21 is offline Newbie
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    Post "Look forward" vs "look forward to"

    Does "look forawrd and look forward to" have any differences?

  2. #2
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    spongie is offline Member
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    Default Re: "Look forward" vs "look forward to"

    As far as I am concerned, "look forward" is a phrasal verb that has to be followed by "to".

    I look forward to hearing from you.
    I look forward hearing from you.

  3. #3
    yousrati is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: "Look forward" vs "look forward to"

    Hello,

    According to the Oxford Dictionary :
    look forward to something means : to be thinking with pleasure about something that is going to happen (because you expect to enjoy it) I'm looking forward to the weekend.
    As you may have noticed , is used with (To).

  4. #4
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    Default Re: "Look forward" vs "look forward to"

    Quote Originally Posted by arnasarutis21 View Post
    Does "look forawrd and look forward to" have any differences?
    Yes. "Look forward" means "face the front", as in "Look forward when you're driving!"

  5. #5
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    Default Re: "Look forward" vs "look forward to"

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Yes. "Look forward" means "face the front", as in "Look forward when you're driving!"
    I initially thought of posting a similar response, because it seems logical. Then I changed my mind. Would you really say that?

  6. #6
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    Default Re: "Look forward" vs "look forward to"

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I initially thought of posting a similar response, because it seems logical. Then I changed my mind.
    So did I. Then I changed my mind again and decided to answer.

    Would you really say that?
    No. I'd say, "Look where you're going!" or "Watch where you're driving!" But it would still mean "look forward". It might not have been the best example, but it demonstrates for the OP the obvious (to us) fact that these phrases mean different things.

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