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    #1

    Post Three Kinds of idiom

    Hi, Teachers

    I don't get the point about these

    According to Seidl and McMordie, they divided idiom into three kinds of idiom
    1. Form irregular, meaning clear, as in give someone to understand, do someone proud, do the dirty on someone.
    2.
    Form regular, meaning unclear, as in have a bee in one’s bonnet, cut no ice, bring the house down.
    3.
    Form irregular, meaning unclear, as in be at large, go great guns, be at daggers drawn.

    What are the meaning Form Irregular and Form Regular above? What I think just Regular and Irregular verbs but I doubt about it.

    Please tell me..
    Thanks in advance.

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    #2

    Re: Three Kinds of idiom

    Please give me explanation, i"m begging to you all....

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    #3

    Re: Three Kinds of idiom

    1 The form is irregular in the sense that 'give/proud/dirty' don't have their obvious meaning. There is no 'giving' in 'giving someone to understand....'; in 'do someone proud', 'proud' is not an adjective, nor is 'dirty' in 'do the dirty on someone'. Recognizing the form ('give someone <something>, 'proud/dirty' = <adj>) is no help in deciphering the idiom.

    2 The meaning of 'to have a bee in one's bonnet' is unclear. But the form is obvious: you can know what 'have' bee' in' and 'bonnet' all mean, but still have no idea what the idiom means.

    3 Both meaning and form are unclear/irregular. Usual 'Be at...' collocations have nouns, not adjectives: 'Be at peace/leisure/a disadvantage...'; usual 'go...' collocations are adverbs('...carefully/quietly/gently...') not noun phrases ('great guns');... But if I explained the form, and said "'large' there is a noun" you'd still be no nearer guessing the meaning.

    I hope that makes sese. The analysis is new to me, and I'm not sure it's very useful. But it's interesting. I'd like to know what other teachers think...

    b

    POS You don't 'beg to someone', you just 'beg them'. You can see the words 'beg' and 'to' together, but that's in expreesions such as 'beg to differ' [=disagree, but humbly].
    Last edited by BobK; 29-Feb-2012 at 18:00. Reason: PS Added

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    #4

    Re: Three Kinds of idiom

    Thank you BobK. I think your explanations make sense. I get the point.

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