Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Aussie idiom

  1. #1
    Pirimillo is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Ecuador
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    Aussie idiom

    Hello,

    What does a person mean when they say "you have a rear way of playing with words"?

  2. #2
    susiedq is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    268
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Aussie idiom

    Are you sure it wasn't "real way of playing with words."?

  3. #3
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is online now VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19,895
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Aussie idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by Pirimillo View Post
    Hello,

    What does a person mean when they say "you have a rear way of playing with words"?
    Are you sure it's an Aussie idiom? I've never heard it, and it doesn't sound Aussie.
    What's your source?

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    23,870
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Aussie idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Are you sure it's an Aussie idiom? I've never heard it, and it doesn't sound Aussie.
    What's your source?
    I don't know about an idiom, but I think the word might have been "rare", not "rear" or "real".

    She has a rare talent.
    You have a rare way of dealing with things.

    It just means "unusual" or "uncommon". I don't think it's particularly Australian though, unless there's a user from Australia here who can think of a particularly Aussie idiom using "rare".

  5. #5
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,671
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Aussie idiom

    That's much more likely - 'rare' meaning 'extraordinary/unusual'.

    I agree that it's not particularly Australian, but I've often noticed that languages in a colonial context can be both conservative and innovative - and 'rare' in that sense is almost archaic in Br Eng. Similarly, the word 'contrary' - meaning something like 'argumentative' (which in the UK is known chiefly in the nursery rhyme 'Mary Mary/Quite contrary) - is common in Australian English. In Br Eng, we tend to say 'headstrong', 'opinionated', (informally) 'bloody-minded, 'mischievous', 'argumentative', 'curmudgeonly', 'hard to get on with, 'obstructive, 'obstreperous''.... or whatever near-synonym is most appropriate.
    b
    Last edited by BobK; 01-Mar-2012 at 11:02. Reason: Fix typo and add 'contrary' analogy

  6. #6
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is online now VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19,895
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Aussie idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Similarly, the word 'contrary' - [...] is common in Australian English.
    b
    I would not have said so. Can you present anything to convince me it's common here?

  7. #7
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,671
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Aussie idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I would not have said so. Can you present anything to convince me it's common here?
    Only anecdotal evidence. Several Australians that I know use it. Perhaps what I've noticed is a common trait among Australians who have emigrated, or perhaps I'm just wrong.

    b

  8. #8
    Pirimillo is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Ecuador
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Aussie idiom

    Hello,

    I could have been a typo be the 'sender'. I think I have it figured out.
    Thanks to all of you.

Similar Threads

  1. aussie
    By ostap77 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 13-Oct-2010, 23:16
  2. [Idiom] why can't i view all aussie idioms??
    By itami sensei in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Jun-2010, 13:51
  3. [Idiom] The meaning of an idiom or is it not an idiom?
    By purpleblossom in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-Feb-2010, 16:50
  4. [General] What's the difference between Aussie and Australian?
    By hellofox in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-Sep-2008, 16:27
  5. REPLY TO THIS IDIOM(i want to know the idiom)
    By MOgnaraj in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-Oct-2006, 15:37

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •